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What should I feed new chicks?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

A healthy full-grown bird begins on day one. Provide a balanced starter diet to new chicks, based on their breed traits. Complete feeds are formulated to meet the needs of growing chicks and should comprise 90% of the diet.

  • For chicks who will later lay eggs, select a feed that has 18 percent protein, like Purina® Start & Grow® Crumbles or Purina® Organic Starter-Grower.
  • For meat birds and mixed flocks, choose a complete feed with 20 percent protein, like Purina® Flock Raiser® Crumbles.
  • For laying hens, transition chicks onto a higher-calcium complete feed, such as Purina® Layena® Crumbles and Pellets or Purina® Organic Layer Crumbles and Pellets, when they begin laying eggs at age 18 to 20 weeks.
post #2 of 6

When would medicated feed with amprolium be appropriate? When would you know you needed that versus the non-medicated chick starter?

Livin' and lovin' life on 8 acres in NW Arizona!
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Livin' and lovin' life on 8 acres in NW Arizona!
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post #3 of 6


You should choose a medicated feed option (with amprolium) if your birds were not vaccinated at the hatchery for coccidiosis.  If they were vaccinated, then you do not need to use the medicated option.  If you are unsure, then use the medicated option.  Once you start feeding amprolium to these birds, you will need to continue that until they begin to lay eggs.  The purpose of amprolium is to help protect the young birds against coccidiosis.

post #4 of 6
Hi! Just a question on Rhode Island Reds. I have 3 chicks feeding on starter. They are about 3 weeks old. I plan to raise them for eggs. Do I transition to Grower feed as they get older? If so, when? When do I start layer feed and do I only feed layer feed to the hens or do I use any scratch feed at any time for them? Kinda new to this. Thanks :0)
post #5 of 6

It depends on the manufacturer's line of feed you are using and the protein percentages. The bag of feed should give feeding directions and when to switch to the next type feed.

Some, like Start and Grow are intended to be a dual purpose feed from hatch through point of lay. Others have a higher protein for young birds so you would need to transition at an earlier age.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Ducote View Post

Hi! Just a question on Rhode Island Reds. I have 3 chicks feeding on starter. They are about 3 weeks old. I plan to raise them for eggs. Do I transition to Grower feed as they get older? If so, when? When do I start layer feed and do I only feed layer feed to the hens or do I use any scratch feed at any time for them? Kinda new to this. Thanks :0)

Great question, Ken! Chicks should be fed a grower feed, like Purina® Start & Grow® or Purina® Flock Raiser®, from hatch until they are 18 weeks old. At 18 weeks, you’ll want to transition your flock to a layer feed, like Purina® Layena® or Purina® Layena® Plus Omega-3. You can supplement with Purina® Scratch Grains to encourage natural pecking and feeding instincts, but it is not a complete feed and it should only make up 10% of their diet, at most.

Check out our feeding chart for more information: http://www.purinamills.com/chicken-feed/feeding-charts/feeding-chart/

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