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Rooster Attacking our Shoes

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Good Evening! I have a question: Is there any way to stop our rooster from attacking our shoes? We inadvertently were given a rooster when we picked up six chicks last April. He's very good with our hens, he likes to eat food out of anyone's hand and he's generally a very good bird, but he started attacking our shoes when we walk very close to him. My young children are now afraid to be outside by him. I've tried picking him up and holding him for 20 min. or so after he attacks the shoes. I've tried kicking him away (not hard) as he's attacking the shoes (this just gets him going even more). It's like he only has eyes for the shoes when he 'zones in' on them. He holds his head just inches off the ground, fluffs up his feathers and eventually attacks. When I say his name and he looks up at me, he immediately settles down, but then when my shoes move again, he can't help himself. Any way I can stop this behavior?

 

Thank you for your help! 

post #2 of 8

This seems like a common behavior with the roosters I have had in the past. You're right, kicking back will make it worse over time, so try not to do that unless you have to defend yourself. It sounds like holding him is a good idea and I would keep that up. Unfortunately, the attacks are based mostly off instinct, and there isn't much you can do, although it varies from rooster to rooster, so try a different one if need be.

...WW
< '.....\ _____ /.|
....\___..... __ /
....... _/._/........... o
srk
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...WW
< '.....\ _____ /.|
....\___..... __ /
....... _/._/........... o
srk
Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you for you advice! We will see if holding him more will stop the attacks. I'm not confident, but I'll try anything to see if it works (I would have a really hard time 'taking care of the rooster' if he doesn't stop). 

post #4 of 8

He's still very young, and is likely to escalate his attacks as time passes.  He's dangerous, especially to small children!  Walking 'through' him, making him move away from you always, and don't try to make him a 'pet', because he needs to be respectful, and right now he's not.  Your children should be afraid of him, and that's not right, or safe.  Have someone invite him to dinner if you can't, unless he totally reforms in a hurry.  That little brain isn't that likely to reprogram, and smart sensible cocks don't attack humans.  Mary

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks, Mary! I've been researching rooster behavior on the internet and your advice seems to be right on par. Our rooster has to change quick otherwise I can't have him around. We have other families who come and visit our chickens and gardens during the spring, summer and fall and I don't want to worry about the rooster attacking other people. Just can't chance it. We are trying to find him another home, but if this doesn't work out he will have to go (if his behavior doesn't change).

post #6 of 8


I have used a pressurised plant sprayer (the hand held ones, typically used indoors) or a water pistol to keep my roos in check in the past. After a couple of squirts, my roos would run away at the sight of me holding it. You can try to rectify his behaviour, but personally, with children around, he'd be in the pot.

 

CT

Nairobi, Kenya
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Nairobi, Kenya
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post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

I like the water idea. Thank you, CT! I'll have to give it a try and see how the roo responds.

post #8 of 8

The down side of the water idea is that the roo will only be conditioned to flee if he sees the water.  What's he going to do when a child approaches, and you're not around to defend that child?  If he were in my yard, he'd be in the crock pot.  Too much is at risk here.  If, as recommended by Mary, you do try to rehab him by walking through where ever he happens to be, I'd include carrying a fine fiberglass or bamboo pole to use as an extension of your arm to shoo him away. Make this activity part of your chicken chores.  When you feed the flock, shoo him away from the feed and away from the girls.  (my rule with roos is that they don't ever come within arm's reach of me.)  However, given that he perseverates on your shoes, I doubt that this boy is capable of grasping the whole picture, and is not capable of being rehabbed.  I think he's a bit too addled in the brain!

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

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Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
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