BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Quail › Quail egg allergy?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Quail egg allergy?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Do any of you folks know if it is possible to be allergic to quail eggs because of what the hen has been fed?

post #2 of 10

It's possible if you've got a soy allergy and they're fed soy.  Some birds process the soy better and their eggs are fine.  If you've eaten quail eggs before, and you say you have, they were most likely fed soy.  Soy is the most common ingredient in animal feed due to it's high protein content.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

EM TY,

Yes, I have discovered that soy is a primary ingredient of feed.  I have numerous allergies.  I likely wouldn't become allergic right away, but down the road.  I'll just have to play it by ear and not worry about it too much at this point.

 

SuseyQ

post #4 of 10

Susey,

 

Ducks are better at "filtering out" the effects of feed on people who consume their eggs.  Quail seem to be even better, but it may come down to the individual.  All you can do it try and my guess is you'll be just fine. 

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Em Ty,

That is what I plan to do.  I'm glad quail eggs have such positive qualities.

 

SuseyQ

post #6 of 10

I'm allergic to everything, including chicken eggs. I can eat both quail and duck eggs without a problem. I do raise them myself but I feed them both chicken crumbles. I had chickens and fed them the crumbles but still couldn't eat the eggs for some reason. 

post #7 of 10
I've *heard* that some people can't eat chicken eggs from the grocery but are fine to eat chicken eggs from backyard chickens.

They guess it's the feed and perhaps the commercial poultry are fed much more pesticides which transfers to the eggs?

I've read that quail eggs have an ingredient that's useful for quelling allergies - here's more info on that - http://www.ovogenics.eu/en/page/history.html
post #8 of 10

It will be one (or more) of the proteins specific to chicken eggs that causes your reaction. Luckily you have other options.

 

Interestingly, I recently found a supplement to help with allergies, such as hayfever and eczema. It's made from proteins derived from quail eggs! 

post #9 of 10

My understanding is that egg allergies are usually actually allergies to the phytoestrogens (sp?) present in chicken eggs due to the soy in the feed.  Ducks pass far less pytoestrogens through in the eggs, and quail almost none.  As soy is the cheapest and most common source of protein in animal feed, almost all feed for birds is soy-based.  From what I've heard, most people with 'egg' allergies are fine with duck eggs and those that aren't are fine with quail eggs.  If the feed doesn't use soy (peanuts is the likely substitute), even the chicken eggs are probably fine.

 

My personal experience with quail eggs is incredible.  I raised about 80 quail on fermented, soy-based, natural (pre-organic cert) 28% turkey starter.  I found that fermenting the feed (search the site for 'fermented feed') saved me about 50% on my feed bill.  I also found that 12-18 quail eggs a day completely cured my environmental allergies.  I had been taking 4 over-the-counter allergy pills a day in order to just get by, but after eating 12-18 quail eggs a day for 4 days, I no longer had to take the pills.  Not only that, I was able to breathe much better and smell much better than when I took the pills.  This lasted until about 2 weeks after I stopped eating 12-18 eggs a day because a predator killed my quail.  I am back taking 4 pills a day and I can't breathe or smell as well as when I had the eggs. 

 

Your experience may differ.  The guy who gave the presentation that got me into quail had the same experience with environmental allergies, but told us not to believe him.  He is a science teacher and I'm an engineer.  I still have trouble believing that the quail eggs actually cured my allergies, but that's been my experience.  I'm moving soon so I'm going to hold off on more quail, but I'll be looking for eggs until I can provide my own. 

 

Good luck with everything.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Em Ty View Post
 

My understanding is that egg allergies are usually actually allergies to the phytoestrogens (sp?) present in chicken eggs due to the soy in the feed.  Ducks pass far less pytoestrogens through in the eggs, and quail almost none.  As soy is the cheapest and most common source of protein in animal feed, almost all feed for birds is soy-based.  From what I've heard, most people with 'egg' allergies are fine with duck eggs and those that aren't are fine with quail eggs.  If the feed doesn't use soy (peanuts is the likely substitute), even the chicken eggs are probably fine.

 

My personal experience with quail eggs is incredible.  I raised about 80 quail on fermented, soy-based, natural (pre-organic cert) 28% turkey starter.  I found that fermenting the feed (search the site for 'fermented feed') saved me about 50% on my feed bill.  I also found that 12-18 quail eggs a day completely cured my environmental allergies.  I had been taking 4 over-the-counter allergy pills a day in order to just get by, but after eating 12-18 quail eggs a day for 4 days, I no longer had to take the pills.  Not only that, I was able to breathe much better and smell much better than when I took the pills.  This lasted until about 2 weeks after I stopped eating 12-18 eggs a day because a predator killed my quail.  I am back taking 4 pills a day and I can't breathe or smell as well as when I had the eggs. 

 

Your experience may differ.  The guy who gave the presentation that got me into quail had the same experience with environmental allergies, but told us not to believe him.  He is a science teacher and I'm an engineer.  I still have trouble believing that the quail eggs actually cured my allergies, but that's been my experience.  I'm moving soon so I'm going to hold off on more quail, but I'll be looking for eggs until I can provide my own. 

 

Good luck with everything.


​The supplement is Clinicians Allerstop - might be an alternative until you can get back to keeping quail. 

 

Here's a bit of the blurb:

 

"AllerStop contains specialised proteins isolated from Quail eggs, and was originally discovered in the 1970’s in France, where research allergist Dr G. Bruttmann found a powdered quail egg formula that provided natural support for the body’s response to environmental irritants."

 

They are amazing little things and used for many different ailments.  They are big in Chinese medicine and I recently read an article about a man who took quail eggs for Gout after a business trip took him to China and they were recommended to him. Though he still has the swelling, he is without pain. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Quail
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Quail › Quail egg allergy?