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Beginning of the chicken journey!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

New here to this site and wanted to show our families progress of our journey to raising chickens!  This whole endeavor started with us getting a small pot belly pig last year and then wanting our children to grow up with responsibilities and good fresh food.  My wife and I have a 15 month girl(who loves animals) and another one on the way.  So we decided to start the journey of raising chickens!  We ordered 6 barred rocks the other day so need to get the ball rolling!  I started looking at plans while at work for probably 16 hours, while I ended up drawing 4 or 5 different plans.  So I ended up with this:

 

 

I then figured out all my lumber and supplies and took a trip to Lowes.  Got out of Lowes for $857!  Thankfully the man at the register charged me for 12 of the 5# 3" exterior screws when I only bought one, so got some money back there.

 

The structure is 8'x4'x6'.  It will have a 9/12ish pitch roof at 38.4 degrees.  It will sit a little over 2' off the ground on some blocks so if later I need to move it.  This is my first time building anything like this so lets see how this goes, if there are any suggestions or questions please feel free to tell or ask!

 

Day 1:

 

Pre-construction right next to the pig pen.

South wall, 24" centers.

East entry where door will go and North wall with 16" centers.  This wall is where the 3 coops will be going. 

West wall 24" center where run opening will be and South wall again.  You can see the east gable vent, there will also we a west one as well.

Roof framed out 9/12ish pitch, 38.4 degrees. 12" over hang on each end. 

Sheathed with 3/8 plywood.

Tar paper on, shingles to come near the end.  After this night we had a horrible storm come through and I had to move all the wood to the east side for the weight and took some 2x4's to brace structure from twisting to much and blowing over.

You can see the 3 coops here, leaned up against it is the roof that will have hinges to open.  Siding is T1-11 siding panel. 

 

More progress to show after this weekend.  Hopefully I can get it finished in two days.

post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by RcHE2 View Post
 

New here to this site and wanted to show our families progress of our journey to raising chickens!  This whole endeavor started with us getting a small pot belly pig last year and then wanting our children to grow up with responsibilities and good fresh food.  My wife and I have a 15 month girl(who loves animals) and another one on the way.  So we decided to start the journey of raising chickens!  We ordered 6 barred rocks the other day so need to get the ball rolling!  I started looking at plans while at work for probably 16 hours, while I ended up drawing 4 or 5 different plans.  So I ended up with this:

 

 

I then figured out all my lumber and supplies and took a trip to Lowes.  Got out of Lowes for $857!  Thankfully the man at the register charged me for 12 of the 5# 3" exterior screws when I only bought one, so got some money back there.

 

The structure is 8'x4'x6'.  It will have a 9/12ish pitch roof at 38.4 degrees.  It will sit a little over 2' off the ground on some blocks so if later I need to move it.  This is my first time building anything like this so lets see how this goes, if there are any suggestions or questions please feel free to tell or ask!

 

Day 1:

 

Pre-construction right next to the pig pen.

South wall, 24" centers.

East entry where door will go and North wall with 16" centers.  This wall is where the 3 coops will be going. 

West wall 24" center where run opening will be and South wall again.  You can see the east gable vent, there will also we a west one as well.

Roof framed out 9/12ish pitch, 38.4 degrees. 12" over hang on each end. 

Sheathed with 3/8 plywood.

Tar paper on, shingles to come near the end.  After this night we had a horrible storm come through and I had to move all the wood to the east side for the weight and took some 2x4's to brace structure from twisting to much and blowing over.

You can see the 3 coops here, leaned up against it is the roof that will have hinges to open.  Siding is T1-11 siding panel. 

 

More progress to show after this weekend.  Hopefully I can get it finished in two days.


I'm looking forward to seeing the inside when your coop is completed. Welcome to BYC.

post #3 of 7

Welcome to BYC!

Looks solid, nice over hangs on roof.

 

What is your climate? Putting your location in your profile will help folks give better answers/suggestions.

 

I'd suggest leaving eaves open, covered with 1/2" hardware cloth from outside, for ventilation.

Keep your roosts as low as possible, due to narrow coop, about a foot above nests.

 

Looks forward to seeing your progress!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

We live in eastern Maryland so we get some mild winters and warmer summers.  Ocean really helps us stay pretty regulated.  I planned on leaving the eaves all open and putting the hardware cloth along them.  Figured it would be better to have more ventilation in there that I could close up a bit in the winter if I needed to than not enough  Thank you for the thoughts on the roosts!  I have been looking around trying to figure out what I was going to do with them, I guess that is what I will do.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Day 3 update:

Got everything up and sided.  It was windy today so it was a hard one man job hanging that T1-11.

My little helper.

Finished the door and run door.  Installed the pulley and rope to open the run door.

You can see the run door and the nest boxes.  It's livable for when my day olds come but still need to make a run ramp, seperate the nest boxes some more and figure out the locations for the roosting wood.

 

I did get the roof shingled on day 4 but apparently my phone didn't want to save the pictures.  If someone has any suggestions or wants to see something more to help out on a suggestions let me know as this is my first coop and open to anything!  Thanks!

post #6 of 7

Are you going to have some windows for light and more ventilation in summer?

You mentioned having problem with the wind almost tipping over coop before, have you got it tied down now?

OhMy toddler overalls taking me way back..sigh.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Yes I am going to be putting some windows in.  Going up to a older local window guy and see if he has some thing that people haven't picked up or wants to get rid of and see how it goes but they are planned.  The coop almost tipped before because I had the roof on and just the studs so there was really no weight to it yet.  With all the siding on and 2 packs of shingles it is pretty heavy and sturdy now.  If I do have a problem in the future I will end up tieing it down.  Haha yeah we had to get her some coveralls because she was ruining a pair of pants everytime she went outside since she loves working with me and playing with the dogs and pig.

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