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How far do we let the coyotes go? - Page 3

post #21 of 28

You could also get a bow and arrow and a hunting license I don't know how close you are to people. Let put it this way there coming from the woods. In most states coyotes are legal to bait and also use electronic calls. Please check your local regulations also coyote are usally legal to hunt at night For example in Massachusetts Hunting hours go till midnight. So if you did manage to kill one basically you could skin it and leave the carcus in the woods were you found it just a suggestion I'm new to birds but I have been hunting for a little while.

 

EDIT:

 

http://www.predatordown.com/california-coyote-hunting-regulations/

 

Its not an official site but it does provide some good information 


Edited by NewhAtch3r - 2/28/16 at 7:46am
post #22 of 28
Coyotes have become terribly bold around where I live too. I live in Michigan, which is packed with coyotes, and they are little rats. My labrador retriever was stalked by one in our own back yard, maybe twenty feet from our house. (She is okay but it scared the daylight out of her.) I am so sorry about your loss, both of your hens are beautiful. I would say that the game warden is a good idea, I'm sure he would know something about it. If not, I would try wire around the fence. If you don't have a rooster, you might benefit by that too. Roosters can yell a warning to the girls so they can take cover. I don't have chickens yet, we are getting some, and I am trying to figure out a way to make it Fort Knox. I hope you get this figured out soon though!! Happy hens, happy owner.
post #23 of 28
Some people won't agree with this. And if their are other animals like the neighbors dogs or cats that could get into it don't do it. But put some poison in some ground beef. To me if you kill my chickens it's like killing my family. I don't feel bad about poisoning something that kills my family.
But like I said some people won't like it.
post #24 of 28

I don't know about in California but in Massachusetts it is ill-legal to take the animal that way. it if you poison it you actually maybe braking the law and risking damaging well and water sources. If it does rain out I would say legally take the animal or tell a hunter about the animal and let him do it fact is the coyotes is actually coming in your yard and if you have children they could be in danger too(Most likely not but still thats how i would deal with it).

 

edit: Cheysr21

 

Im not offended I just think its a more dangerous method then is needed.


Edited by NewhAtch3r - 2/29/16 at 11:42am
post #25 of 28

If you can't use firearms, try searching coyote fishing.

Well it's, alright now,

I learned my lesson well. See ya,

can't please everyone, so ya,

gotta please yourself.

 

The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren Bennis~
 

Reply

Well it's, alright now,

I learned my lesson well. See ya,

can't please everyone, so ya,

gotta please yourself.

 

The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren Bennis~
 

Reply
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewhAtch3r View Post

I don't know about in California but in Massachusetts it is ill-legal to take the animal that way. it if you poison it you actually maybe braking the law and risking damaging well and water sources. If it does rain out I would say legally take the animal or tell a hunter about the animal and let him do it fact is the coyotes is actually coming in your yard and if you have children they could be in danger too(Most likely not but still thats how i would deal with it).

edit: Cheysr21


Im not offended I just think its a more dangerous method then is needed.

I guess it could be. But we live in the middle of nowhere arkansas. And that's just how I grew up handling things like that.
Either poisoning or shooting them is what we always did. Even if we just shot it with a low powered rifle, that would scare it away.
post #27 of 28

Seems to be a pretty good mix in the replies.  I do understand the "encroachment" posting, but tend to side with the "get rid of the problem" posts.  I have a different situation, I have a semi-rural 10 acres. Shooting a coyote would not only be legal, but appreciated by my neighbors.  That said, I do think it's my responsibility to build the best coop I can, addressing as many threats as possible in the construction.  Sounds great and I sleep well at night, but I just can't take the freedom away from my birds.  They seem to love to free range and I love the reduction of bugs and mice (I love seeing the hens break out of the barn for a quick game of mouse rugby).  I never knew they caught mice, but they do and it's hilarious.  I have one Barred Rock who I am certain out performs the lazy barn cats around here. - Getting off topic.

 

I too have lost hens to coyotes, but I guess they are gonna hunt them, I'm gonna try and stop them, but I know that and populate my flock accordingly.  I have an egg target, know I can get what is needed plus a little extra with 8 hens, so I keep 10, and bring in enough new blood every year to deal with the occasional loss.  I have a great perch to observe any coyote activity and use it when the howling gets close or spotting is frequent.  Unfortunately gun oil must smell worse than chicken smells good to Mr. Coyote.  To date keeping more hens has proven more effective than whacking the predators, that said, they understand they are persona non grata around here and most sightings are of the south end on a high speed north bound escape.  Many of you are probably thinking I'm some kind of wacky hay-seed, but protection of my flock is part of the deal and I will admit can be kind of fun.

 

Classic American literature, man vs nature, man foolish enough to think nature is conquerable, nature defeats man, but man wins just enough to not become tragic.  I look at it like Hemmingway, my wife looks at it like Elmer Fudd during rabbit season.  OK - Once again, back to topic.

 

If you don't find these tactics against your moral fiber, go get a good pellet gun.  Spend a little money, get a break open with a scope in .22 caliber.  Read the manual, and if you have a knowledgeable friend, maybe they could show you the basics.  This is not a guy only thing, studies have shown women tend to be very good natural shots (something about hand/eye coordination).  Get some cans and go try it!  I would bet you have fun plinking targets, your neighbors will never hear you and you will have more than enough to send Mr. Coyote back through the fence.  If you do this, be safe.  These guns are not toys, but they really can be fun too.  Your chickens will be really proud.

post #28 of 28

Muzzle loaders are a great option for some people its a single shot rifle that loads threw the muzzle Under federal law if is a reproduction of before a certain year its not classified as a "firearm". Again do you research. =P happy hunting

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