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Should I treat a "thriving, healthy looking" pullet for coccidiosis?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Had a small flock of 3 Buff Orpingtons about 4 months of age.  In the last week I lost 2 to what I now believe was coccidiosis.  The 2 that died were the smaller almost younger looking of the 3 ( all 3 from same breeder in Jan of this year) All 3 have been outside in a coop and run since I bought them and were able to free range just about daily.  My question is do I treat the one thriving healthy looking girl with medication? or do I just make sure she has ample probiotics, vitamins maybe electrolytes?

post #2 of 7

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

 

How do you know they died of coccidiosis? Did you have a necropsy done to see what killed them?

 

You can find your state lab/s on the following list.

 

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahln/downloads/all_nahln_lab_list.pdf

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 7

Sorry for your losses. :(

 

I would have a test done on them.

 

Were these birds some you raised from chicks, or did you buy them from someone else who started them?

 

Did you see evidence of lethargy, bloody poops, going off food/water?

 

MrsB


Edited by MrsBrooke - 3/2/16 at 11:09am

Australorp Chickens | Nigerian Dwarf and mini-Alpine Goats | American Blue Rabbits

 

"If not now, when?"

 

Luke 22:36

Then said He unto them,

“But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it

and likewise his pack; and he that hath no sword,

let him sell his garment and buy one."

 

How I lost 70 lbs (and kept it off!): www.marksdailyapple.com

Reply

Australorp Chickens | Nigerian Dwarf and mini-Alpine Goats | American Blue Rabbits

 

"If not now, when?"

 

Luke 22:36

Then said He unto them,

“But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it

and likewise his pack; and he that hath no sword,

let him sell his garment and buy one."

 

How I lost 70 lbs (and kept it off!): www.marksdailyapple.com

Reply
post #4 of 7

Agree with the above posts.  More info would be helpful such as the symptoms of the ones that died, have any new birds been added recently?  Usually by this age birds have developed good resistance to  the strains of cocci that are in their environement.  It's certainly not that they can't pop up with a case of coccidiosis, it just gets less likely as they get older.  Unless they are moved to new property or new birds are brought in, then they are susceptible at any age under those conditions.

 

If your hen is currently active, eating/drinking, poops are normal and otherwise looking normal I don't think I'd necessarily treat just yet unless your other birds had a confirmed case or very obvious symptoms. 

wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
Reply
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for the responses.  The 2 that died did stop eating and drinking the day before they passed.  I also noticed they were  hunched over and not active.  On the day the last one passed there was bloody poo in the bedding, something I surly could have missed with the first one days before... not a ton of blood but watery pink stained pine shavings. The birds also seemed rather skinny, which I didn't notice since they were Buff Orpingtons and always seemed so plump. I I did not have a test run on either of them and we did not have any new birds added but we have been fighting a battle with wild birds invading the yard and getting into the feeders- we have added bird netting all over and around the yard now and the wild birds no longer can access the feeders.  I am going to take a proactive approach to my lone girl and add some vitamins to her water and keep a close eye on her health.

post #6 of 7

She also needs friends. Lone chickens don't usually thrive.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

Reply
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenCanoe View Post
 

She also needs friends. Lone chickens don't usually thrive.

 

x2! Give her a mirror, so she can check her complexion!

 

Also, if it would make you feel better, you *could* treat everyone with Corid, since it's a gentle, safe medication.

 

It's 2 teaspoons (no less) per gallon of water of the 20% powder

OR

1.5 teaspoons per gallon for the 9.6% liquid.

 

Make sure it's the only water they can access for 5-7 days, then run vitamins through their water for a few days to help them bounce back. :)

 

I'd still get them tested if you have any more deaths.

 

When was the last time you wormed everyone?

 

MrsB

Australorp Chickens | Nigerian Dwarf and mini-Alpine Goats | American Blue Rabbits

 

"If not now, when?"

 

Luke 22:36

Then said He unto them,

“But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it

and likewise his pack; and he that hath no sword,

let him sell his garment and buy one."

 

How I lost 70 lbs (and kept it off!): www.marksdailyapple.com

Reply

Australorp Chickens | Nigerian Dwarf and mini-Alpine Goats | American Blue Rabbits

 

"If not now, when?"

 

Luke 22:36

Then said He unto them,

“But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it

and likewise his pack; and he that hath no sword,

let him sell his garment and buy one."

 

How I lost 70 lbs (and kept it off!): www.marksdailyapple.com

Reply
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