BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Managing Your Flock › Is two roosters with fourteen hens too much?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is two roosters with fourteen hens too much?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hi, so right now, I have six chickens (lost the rest to internal parasites this fall :(); four White Leghorns and two Barred Rocks. I ordered eleven chicks this winter and got them four weeks ago. I got four Partridge Rocks hens, four Light Brahma hens, and four Light Brahma roosters (they sent an extra free one). I am eventually going to sell or give away all the roosters as soon as possible, but need to keep two of them for the show (which will be July/August). So, if I keep two roosters with fourteen hens, will that be all right, especially considering that they are a gentle breed? Also, I may not be able to get rid of all of the roosters immediately, so will having three or four with them be all right for a little while? Thanks in advance.

 

P.S. If you or anyone you know is located near mid-Eastern Minnesota and are interested in taking a rooster in, let me know!


Edited by Blackberry18 - 3/3/16 at 7:24am
2 Barred Rocks, 4 White Leghorns, 6 Light Brahmas, and 3 Partridge Rocks

"There are two types of (people) in this world;
those who want to be astronauts,
and those who want to be astronomers."


- Dr. Alan Grant, Jurassic Park III
Reply
2 Barred Rocks, 4 White Leghorns, 6 Light Brahmas, and 3 Partridge Rocks

"There are two types of (people) in this world;
those who want to be astronauts,
and those who want to be astronomers."


- Dr. Alan Grant, Jurassic Park III
Reply
post #2 of 5

Personally, I think that's fine. (I've kept more rooster with hens than that. Shh don't tell :rolleyes: )

Just keep an eye out that they aren't injuring themselves or the hens. 

If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

_____________________________________________
Reply
If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

_____________________________________________
Reply
post #3 of 5
I agree it depends on the roosters, be ready to pull them and put them in a separate pen if they become too obnoxious.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #4 of 5

Get that separate pen ready now.....cause when/if it gets ugly, it can happen like right now!!

You may want to keep your show birds alone in separate, roomy pens anyway, to preserve their plumage and avoid any injuries.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Get that separate pen ready now.....cause when/if it gets ugly, it can happen like right now!!
You may want to keep your show birds alone in separate, roomy pens anyway, to preserve their plumage and avoid any injuries.
I missed the part about them being for show. roll.png brahmas are by far the gentlest breed I've seen, but you still should watch out especially with 4 of them together. If it's any comfort, though, I've kept 5 brahma roosters together with very few hens for a time. Everyone was fine. (3 of the roosters were young, though, so they weren't very mature)
I agree with @aart, if they're for show you may want them In separate cages
If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

_____________________________________________
Reply
If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

_____________________________________________
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Managing Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Managing Your Flock › Is two roosters with fourteen hens too much?