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Bullying - Page 2

post #11 of 16

I guess it would depend on where you are re-homing to- if it is only one or two birds going into a larger established flock, in my past experiance they will be at the bottom of the pecking order and so better behaved. You would have to be honest why you are re-homing.

 

Honestly, Mean birds are stew at my house, but for others, their chickens are pets, and would not be able to eat them.

Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
So should I put my bullied hen inside tonight in the dog crate? Or spray her with bluekote and put her back ou
post #13 of 16
Mine were Silver Laced Wyandottes.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SurbFarmGirl View Post

So should I put my bullied hen inside tonight in the dog crate? Or spray her with bluekote and put her back ou

Honesty I would not seperate they bullied girl. I would seperate the mean ones. But eithier way spraying with bluekote will prevent the other hens pecking at any redness.

Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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Homesteading on a 6 acre hobby farm in Southern Wisconsin. Raising a gifted child, A barnyard mix of chickens, Icelandic sheep, A sweet elderly pitty bull, a few barn cats, and a large garden.  

 

 

History Geek- Medieval reenactment, fiber arts and cooking, and natural architectural nut.

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post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by enola View Post

Why would you want to rehome them? I would be really ticked off if some one passed that problem off to me.....

Not everyone re-homes one the sly, if the person re-homing them is up front in telling the new taker they have aggression issues the taker has no reason to be ticked off...

Some people have better setups and can accommodate aggressive birds and won't mind...

And last but not least, to be blunt, a lot of re-homed birds are actually destined to become diner and aggression isn't a concern for the taker...
Edited by MeepBeep - 3/5/16 at 3:57pm
post #16 of 16
I've seen a ton of posts about aggressive Wyandottes lately, frankly, its a little disturbing. I used to have blue laced red Wyandottes, and they were absolutely wonderful birds. Big softies. They did come from a breeder though, and not a hatchery.

I don't think rehoming aggressive birds is a big deal as long as everyone's aware of the situation. That being said, if they were here on my farm, I'd turn them into a pot of chicken-n-dumplings real quick.
Nikki
*C'mon, get flappy!*
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Nikki
*C'mon, get flappy!*
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