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Why did my chick die?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Today, I went to a local farm and bought 6 bantam chicks. They all seemed fine and healthy when I got them, but about an hour ago one of the chicks began laying in a really odd position, and later began twitching. When I tried to stand it up, the chick's legs could not hold it up. The bird lay with its mouth open, and was completely unresponsive. She died a few minutes ago after jerking her head around a bit. This isn't my first time raising chicks, but I have never had one die before. Any guesses on why she died? Could it have been over-heating?? Will my other five die the same death?

 

Thank you for any input. :)

Beauty is all around us, and shows itself in many forms. The flower growing in sidewalk cracks. The birds livening up our mornings. A small smile, a helping hand. Look about you and you'll come to a realization. Beauty is everywhere.

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Beauty is all around us, and shows itself in many forms. The flower growing in sidewalk cracks. The birds livening up our mornings. A small smile, a helping hand. Look about you and you'll come to a realization. Beauty is everywhere.

Reply
post #2 of 6
Thread Starter 
Update: Two more are exhibiting signs. Can anyone tell me what to do??

Beauty is all around us, and shows itself in many forms. The flower growing in sidewalk cracks. The birds livening up our mornings. A small smile, a helping hand. Look about you and you'll come to a realization. Beauty is everywhere.

Reply

Beauty is all around us, and shows itself in many forms. The flower growing in sidewalk cracks. The birds livening up our mornings. A small smile, a helping hand. Look about you and you'll come to a realization. Beauty is everywhere.

Reply
post #3 of 6

This time of year, chicks shipped to feed stores can suffer from cold exposure and shipping stress. It's probably nothing you're doing wrong. Have you noticed any red tinge in their poop? Is it runny?

 

Some of these you may be able to help by dribbling tepid sugar water along their beaks to give them some energy revival.

 

Boil up some eggs and mince the white and yolk separately, and feed the white first since it has more energy in it, then offer the mashed yolk.

 

Make sure the brooder isn't too hot. The zone under the heat source should be between 85 and 95F or around 30C. But the rest of the brooder should be much, much cooler. I'm sure you know that already.

 

I would try the heating pad cave system. It's more natural and more comforting than a heat lamp, unless you're already using that already. So many people are discovering it's much better than a light.

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azygous View Post
 

This time of year, chicks shipped to feed stores can suffer from cold exposure and shipping stress. It's probably nothing you're doing wrong. Have you noticed any red tinge in their poop? Is it runny?

 

Some of these you may be able to help by dribbling tepid sugar water along their beaks to give them some energy revival.

 

Boil up some eggs and mince the white and yolk separately, and feed the white first since it has more energy in it, then offer the mashed yolk.

 

Make sure the brooder isn't too hot. The zone under the heat source should be between 85 and 95F or around 30C. But the rest of the brooder should be much, much cooler. I'm sure you know that already.

 

I would try the heating pad cave system. It's more natural and more comforting than a heat lamp, unless you're already using that already. So many people are discovering it's much better than a light.

Thank you! I will immediately try the eggs with my two remaining chicks. I'm already using a heat lamp, but I'll keep the heating pads in mind for any chicks I raise in the future.

Beauty is all around us, and shows itself in many forms. The flower growing in sidewalk cracks. The birds livening up our mornings. A small smile, a helping hand. Look about you and you'll come to a realization. Beauty is everywhere.

Reply

Beauty is all around us, and shows itself in many forms. The flower growing in sidewalk cracks. The birds livening up our mornings. A small smile, a helping hand. Look about you and you'll come to a realization. Beauty is everywhere.

Reply
post #5 of 6

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply
post #6 of 6

I don't know bantams, but I do know chicks. These chicks are weak. They can't digest any feed or helps you give them. If this is a vitamin or mineral deficiency  then they   need that quickly. You need to get the helps into them and bypass the G.I tract because it's too weak and impaired to uptake the helps. Go to Tractor Supply or your feed store and get the smallest bottle of Bovidr Labs Poultry Nutri-Drench or Goat Nutri-Drench.  Bring it home and dilute in water according to the instructions on the poultry bottle. If the store doesn't have the Poultry Nutri-Drench go to this webste to get the dosage instructions. http://www.nutridrench.com I have used these formulas on dogs and poultry for over a decade. They do not need to by digested. Mainline directly into the bloodstream.  excellent emergency nutritional supplement. All natural. If it were me, I would give each chick a smigen by mouth. Just wet a Q-Tip and rub lightly along the open mouth. Not even a drops worth as they are bantams. one drop is for large fowl new hatched chicks. Then feed then the enhanced water.

Hurry, you don't have much time,

 Karen

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply

Walt Boese strain and Tewart flock of Pure English  Light Sussex

My flock now resides with Farmer Karl in PA.   

  I know he will do well by them. Karl is a knowing poultry man.

RIP Hellbender, my friend. Good friend, good heart, gone too soon.

Reply
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