BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › Getting my confidence back and preventing food agression
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Getting my confidence back and preventing food agression - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks.  I apologize for the confusion. They are all in good health now and laying at a good rate, so, I don't see any reason to cull them :)  I am thinking about rehoming them in August (before our rainy season starts up again), as I don't think we have a good rainy season set up (our run is a not so pretty mix of dirt, straw, and pine chips right now).  I do want to do what I can to keep the peace between them as long as they're mine to take care of.  I will try putting them on my arm and letting them jump down from there.

post #12 of 15


Sorry, i should have said "gently holding their wings with your free hand while lowering them to the ground"

 

CT

Nairobi, Kenya
Reply
Nairobi, Kenya
Reply
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ejcrist View Post
 

I totally agree with what everyone else said about the pecking order stuff. I'm raising my first flock, and had I not read a lot about the pecking order issues I would've been alarmed at all the fuss too. My approach has been mostly hands-off; I don't intervene at all. They know me as the guy with the food and that's about it. I'll feed them treats from my hand a lot and then sprinkle some in their feed troughs, and I figure whoever gets to it first, more power to 'em. I haven't handled them either since they don't seem to like it too much, especially the Leghorns. I value my gals a lot but I keep in mind they're farm animals with a purpose and we get along fine. I definitely wouldn't keep less than three chickens together since they seem highly social. And if you think about the pecking order, it's kinda the same way with most animal groups - even ours. 

 

Thanks.  I think this has been a good learning experience for me, as my past animal experience has been with cats and not with animals like chickens and dogs that have dominance hierarchies.  Also, in learning to be a little more hands off than I was at first.

post #14 of 15
Cats have a hierarchy are well, it's just more subtle. Most urinating in the wrong places for cats has to do with them feeling insecure within it.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #15 of 15


Since mine were small, I made sure to pick each one up every day. They don't love it, but they also don't freak out when I do it, nor are they a bit afraid of me, although I must loom like a skyscraper over them. It's much easier to take good care of them when they accept you as a normal part of life. Mine will walk right up to me and discuss thoroughly what I am wearing and whether it might be edible.

 

Yes, they peck each other, over food or over nothing. As long as they have enough physical room and you are feeding enough, there's very little for you to manage. If Ms. Lowe has to wait 10 minutes for Ms. High to finish eating, oh well, Ms. Lowe won't starve to death.


Edited by jacqueg - 3/28/16 at 7:02am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Feeding & Watering Your Flock
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Feeding & Watering Your Flock › Getting my confidence back and preventing food agression