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Introducing a chicken back into the flock

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hello,
So I had a raccoon attack one of my chickens leaving her entire back wounded and featherless... That was January 26... Today she is still starting to get feathers but her while back is scanned over...but featherless... Is it possible to re-introduce her into the flock yet or do I have to keep her in my house for another month hmm.png and if it is possible to re-introduce her how do you recommend I do that?

Thank you!
post #2 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoeys Chickens View Post

Hello,
So I had a raccoon attack one of my chickens leaving her entire back wounded and featherless... That was January 26... Today she is still starting to get feathers but her while back is scanned over...but featherless... Is it possible to re-introduce her into the flock yet or do I have to keep her in my house for another month hmm.png and if it is possible to re-introduce her how do you recommend I do that?

Thank you!

Can you post a picture of what she looks like please. So I can determine what you should do.

BCP

post #3 of 5
It would be a good time to make a separate pen within your coop to keep her for the next month. It would allow everyone to get used to her again, and have a good look at her. After a month or so they should be familiar with her again and hopefully her feathers will have grown in. Then I would start some supervised mingling putting her back in the pen until you feel she's doing okay.
Edited by oldhenlikesdogs - 3/6/16 at 7:56pm
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

It would be a good time to make a separate pen within your coop to keep her for the next month. It would allow everyone to get used to her again, and have a good look at her. After a month or so they should be familiar with her again and hopefully her feathers will have grown in. Then I would start some supervised mingling putting her back in the pen until you feel she's doing okay.


Very good advice. Theres lots of threads on this topic for further reading - just type "integrating new flock members" in the search box and see what comes up.

 

Good luck

 

CT

Nairobi, Kenya
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Nairobi, Kenya
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post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhenlikesdogs View Post

It would be a good time to make a separate pen within your coop to keep her for the next month. It would allow everyone to get used to her again, and have a good look at her. After a month or so they should be familiar with her again and hopefully her feathers will have grown in. Then I would start some supervised mingling putting her back in the pen until you feel she's doing okay.

Great advice!

 

You might also think about adding one bird from the flock to the separate area for the injured girl as a buddy.....

....if the mingling doesn't go well.

 

Time for some chicken juggling, might take some time and a lot of observation, hopefully you have time for that.

 

More info/pics on your flock and coop/run might help us give you more specific solutions to try.


Edited by aart - 3/7/16 at 6:10am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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