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Does raising the humidity in your incubator cause the temperature to drop?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I searched all over and can't find the answer to this.  I got the temperature just right in my homemade Styrofoam incubator, but humidity was low.  So I added more water, and now the temperature went down.

 

I've been able to find all sorts of wonderful information on the forum, but not specifically the answer to this.  Am I going to have to fiddle with the temperature every time I add water?  (Thankfully I have a digital controller coming this week, but until it arrives...)

Chicken math:  "Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it!" + "If you go looking for trouble you will find it." =  "I got up here, now how do I get down?"

 

Check out my mini fridge incubator build:  http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1102421/the-stealthbator

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Chicken math:  "Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it!" + "If you go looking for trouble you will find it." =  "I got up here, now how do I get down?"

 

Check out my mini fridge incubator build:  http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1102421/the-stealthbator

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post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finnie View Post
 

I searched all over and can't find the answer to this.  I got the temperature just right in my homemade Styrofoam incubator, but humidity was low.  So I added more water, and now the temperature went down.

 

I've been able to find all sorts of wonderful information on the forum, but not specifically the answer to this.  Am I going to have to fiddle with the temperature every time I add water?  (Thankfully I have a digital controller coming this week, but until it arrives...)

Yes, humidity and temps affect each other. When you are adding water if you add very warm water it will help with the temp not dropping as much. As your water dries up and your bator looses humidity your temps (if you don't have a thermostat controlled incubator) will start to rise as well. If I am not running dry during incubation, it's one of the ways I can tell I need to rewet my sponge- the temp will slowly start to increase.  Usually though even if the temp drops a bit when you add water, once the water comes up to temp your incubator temps usually even back out.

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

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Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmyLynn2374 View Post
 As your water dries up and your bator looses humidity your temps (if you don't have a thermostat controlled incubator) will start to rise as well. If I am not running dry during incubation, it's one of the ways I can tell I need to rewet my sponge- the temp will slowly start to increase.  

Thanks so much!  I knew there must be a relationship there, between heating humid air vs heating dryer air.  It takes more energy to heat the humid air.

Chicken math:  "Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it!" + "If you go looking for trouble you will find it." =  "I got up here, now how do I get down?"

 

Check out my mini fridge incubator build:  http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1102421/the-stealthbator

Reply

Chicken math:  "Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it!" + "If you go looking for trouble you will find it." =  "I got up here, now how do I get down?"

 

Check out my mini fridge incubator build:  http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1102421/the-stealthbator

Reply
post #4 of 8
Silly question but, if water runs out in incubator, will the eggs die?
post #5 of 8
Arg, so frustrated! My temp in my bator has been running steady at 99.5, chicks were moving yesterday, today appear to be dead. This is my second attempt in 1 week, same scenario. I took obviously fertilized eggs from my hens into the bator cuz I have s few egg eaters in the coop. Any suggestions?
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjchick View Post

Silly question but, if water runs out in incubator, will the eggs die?

No. I actually run dry the first 17 days of incubation as long as my humidity stays above 25% Humidity level doesn't "kill" the chicks. High humidity over the average of the incubation period will keep the egg from loosing enough moisture preventing the air cell from growing and at hatch the chicks have a higher probability of drowning due to the excess fluid- inability to pip into an air cell or pipping into the air cell and having the excess fluid leaking into it and aspirating on it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cjchick View Post

Arg, so frustrated! My temp in my bator has been running steady at 99.5, chicks were moving yesterday, today appear to be dead. This is my second attempt in 1 week, same scenario. I took obviously fertilized eggs from my hens into the bator cuz I have s few egg eaters in the coop. Any suggestions?

What day are you on? What kind of incubator are you using? What is your humidity levels? Keep them in there and make sure before you toss. 

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
post #7 of 8

Here's a good way to remember the link between temperature and humidity. Here in the semi-desert where I live, and in most of the desert states as well, we use evaporative coolers - otherwise known as "swampers", to cool our homes and buildings. These are large appliances which take a steady steam of water from a small tube, then pass that water over a rolling drum, and blow the moister, cooler air into the house via a large duct. By putting humidity INTO the air, our homes cool down.

post #8 of 8

When I need to add water to the incubator, I add warm/hot water this way the humidity goes up quickly and temperature does not drop. I noticed that cold water affects the inside temperature and humidity will take a while to go up.  

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