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Rejected rooster

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
one of our Roos was attacked by a hawk. It was a long recovery process but he has healed up. for the last couple weeks I ha e Reyes to reintroduce him back into the flock (with another roo) while everyone free ranges. He gets chased away every time. I was thinking about building him a seperate coop and run. (He has been living in a recovery room in the house for a couple months). I am not sure if he will be too lonely though. I haven't seen much luck on my other roo letting him back into the flock. I really don't want to get rid of my other roo though. Any thoughts?
post #2 of 6

How many hens do you have?  If you have enough hens, you could spilt them into two groups and have two coops and runs, then alternate who gets to free range.

post #3 of 6

:welcome

 

It's totally normal for a non-dominant male to spend his live living on the outskirts of the flock. As long as it's just chasing, and he has plenty of room to run away, I'd just leave them be. I'm sure it bothers you a lot more than it bothers him. He likely accepts his place in the dynamic and is okay with it. Someone's got to be the Omega. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
We are down to just 2 hens 😖 As the others were killed by the Hawks. I am rebuilding the flock but with quarantines it takes time. So these poor girls are stuck with these Roos. I'm more worried about when they are in the run and he can run away. The other roo picks him up and throws him into the fence. So once they go back into the run after free ranging I always put the week roo into his crate he has been in for his recovery. Maybe they need more time? He was the dominant one before the injuries.
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post

welcome-byc.gif

It's totally normal for a non-dominant male to spend his live living on the outskirts of the flock. As long as it's just chasing, and he has plenty of room to run away, I'd just leave them be. I'm sure it bothers you a lot more than it bothers him. He likely accepts his place in the dynamic and is okay with it. Someone's got to be the Omega. 
agreed x2
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #6 of 6

If they spend time confined and the other rooster is that aggressive, then yep, you're going to have to separate them. Especially with that few hens. Do you plan to keep both roosters long term? If so, sounds like you'll need a second housing set up. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
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