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Is it normal for roosters to feed the hens? - Page 2

post #11 of 16

My main rooster is three this spring. I've just started giving him treats to dispense to the hens the last few months. Before I'd just scatter treats on the ground, but for some reason I decided to start giving them to him and let him hand them out. We have an established relationship and he's never challenged me, so I'm comfortable with this. He's also still pretty skittish about taking food from my hand. But I love watching him dole out the treats to the hens :)

 

My junior cockerel in the flock is learning to call the hens, but they tend to ignore him still. He's not helping his case when he uses a treat call when there's no treat, he's just trying to bait a hen closer so he can jump on her :/

 

My roosters don't seem to crow when there's a potential danger around. There's an alert call they make that's different. Hens ignore crowing, but when that alert call sounds they freeze and look around to see what's up. So, you don't have to go check things out when your rooster crows. Listen to the different sounds he makes when say a dog goes by the run, or a hawk flies overhead. They actually have different calls for different types of dangers, it's pretty interesting. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #12 of 16

It is so interesting. I think so too. I love to watch them interact in ways I have not seen before or missed.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

So if I'm understanding right in regards to feeding the rooster I just need to make sure he understands I'm higher in the pecking order than him. Like when I first brought them home and tried to walk through the run. The hens would move out of my way but he would challenge me for my path by refusing to move and looking "fluffed" up. I insisted he yield the "right of way".by stepping in closer and the one time he still refused to move I reached down to touch him. Since then he yields the "right of way" and doesn't present me with the fluffed up look.

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackcreek View Post
 

So if I'm understanding right in regards to feeding the rooster I just need to make sure he understands I'm higher in the pecking order than him. Like when I first brought them home and tried to walk through the run. The hens would move out of my way but he would challenge me for my path by refusing to move and looking "fluffed" up. I insisted he yield the "right of way".by stepping in closer and the one time he still refused to move I reached down to touch him. Since then he yields the "right of way" and doesn't present me with the fluffed up look.

That sounds good.

Calm and confident 'rules the roost'.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #15 of 16
He should always move out of the way. I personally wouldn't feed out of hand, dominant birds take things out of submissive birds mouths, so scatter the treats and stay out of the pecking order.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #16 of 16

I also would not hand feed a new rooster, especially one that wasn't totally submissive. I also don't reach down to touch them to get them out of my way, I use my foot. I not-so-gently push them out of my way if they don't move themselves. they get the message pretty well. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
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