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Researching Diseases and Breeds - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa Wood View Post

Sex Link? Is that a breed?

It's a crossbreed. Not a pure breed.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa Wood View Post

Hi again! My husband has been working on the coop with repurchased material. It is raised off the ground. How will young chinks know how to use the ladders?

Teach them. Get them to get in and get out. After a couple times they usually get it down. I use a ramp for my chickens.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa Wood View Post

Sex Link? Is that a breed?

It's a crossbreed done for easy of sexing a chick early on. Some genes in chickens can only be inherited from mother to son or father to daughter. Some are color or pattern sexlinked genes, like those used for black or red sexlinks. Some are feathering genes, which result in slow feathering male chicks and fast to feather females. The Silkie skin color can also be used for sexlinking, but it's not a common practice in the U.S.

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

It's a crossbreed done for easy of sexing a chick early on. Some genes in chickens can only be inherited from mother to son or father to daughter. Some are color or pattern sexlinked genes, like those used for black or red sexlinks. Some are feathering genes, which result in slow feathering male chicks and fast to feather females. The Silkie skin color can also be used for sexlinking, but it's not a common practice in the U.S.

Sex link chicken is more of sexual dimorphism. Because hens will always look one way and males the other way. Sex link gene in birds would be that like the Cameo peafowl.

Cameo cock x Cameo hen= All Cameo peachicks

Cameo cock x Indian Blue hen= Indian Blue split to Cameo cock and Cameo hen

Indian Blue cock x Cameo hen = Indian Blue split to Cameo cock and Cameo hen

Indian Blue split to Cameo cock x Indian Blue = Indian Blue cock, Indian Blue split to Cameo cock, Indian Blue peahen, and Cameo peahen.

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdrain92 View Post
 

Sex link chicken is more of sexual dimorphism. Because hens will always look one way and males the other way. Sex link gene in birds would be that like the Cameo peafowl.

Cameo cock x Cameo hen= All Cameo peachicks

Cameo cock x Indian Blue hen= Indian Blue split to Cameo cock and Cameo hen

Indian Blue cock x Cameo hen = Indian Blue split to Cameo cock and Cameo hen

Indian Blue split to Cameo cock x Indian Blue = Indian Blue cock, Indian Blue split to Cameo cock, Indian Blue peahen, and Cameo peahen.

No. It's not sexual dimorphism. It's that, with chickens, some genes can only be inherited by one gender or another, like in black sexlinks.

To make a black sexlink, you cross a barred hen with a non-barred, non-white rooster. The barred hen can only pass that barring gene to her male offspring. The resulting chicks can be visually sexed at hatching. Males have the white head spot indicating barring, females are solid black.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by junebuggena View Post
 

No. It's not sexual dimorphism. It's that, with chickens, some genes can only be inherited by one gender or another, like in black sexlinks.

To make a black sexlink, you cross a barred hen with a non-barred, non-white rooster. The barred hen can only pass that barring gene to her male offspring. The resulting chicks can be visually sexed at hatching. Males have the white head spot indicating barring, females are solid black.


I know what Sexlinks are like because I've raised them before. Sex link genes can go to either sex. One sex can have the gene, carry it, or not have it at all. While the other sex has it or doesn't have it. Sexual dimorphism is when one sex looks one way while the other sex looks another way.

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