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Capturing/Killing a hawk?? - Page 4

post #31 of 35
I have been chickening for about 3 years now. Small flock of 10 now. We lost 2 of our original 3 red star. And 1 of our barred rocks. To red tails. The funny thing is it seems to be the smaller inexperienced hawks that get in the netting by doing the attack dive right through it. Make the kill and stand there on the corpse looking around after eating the neck out like what do I do now.

I am sick of the migratory bird act. I literally see up to around 20 hawks a day. They aren't in any danger of becoming extinct. My chickens and ducks however are.
Now for the flip side. Here in Florida the b@#ta4ds do eat a lot of pest species we have so its almost a necessary evil.


I have a larger run. Probably 50 x 100 ft. I purchased tree netting from amazon to top it using PVC to hold it up in spots like a circus tent. But as I said earlier they can dive right through it. I am probably going to have to invest in building it up and topping it with welded wire like a giant cage.

Large investment. But take my advise here. If you can afford it. Top it with wire. Otherwise you may find yourself double spending as I am.
post #32 of 35
Hey...i just joined..sorry i dont have chivkens but i have 2 shitzu dogs and today a hawk tried to take one of them she is 7..and aggressive..fought back..feathers everywhere but the other is very mellow laid back..she is 3..if that #####ing hawk attacked her she would probably be dead right now..

This hawk was 2 ft from my back door and i dont care about law its self defense..

I want to get rid of this hawk ..and does anyone know if the same hawk will come back for my dogs because he failed?

Yeah maybe some rat poison outside my doggie gates...

I feel your pain with the chickens so im thinking this forum can give me advice how kill the ******* before it kills my dogs
post #33 of 35
New to this site..but any suggestions to protect my dogs who weigh 12 lbs appreciated....
post #34 of 35

It is very common for hawks to attack dogs this time of year, even bigger dogs. It is the nesting season, and they primarily do it in defense of their nest, which is most likely very close. I would say that a dog that can't take care of itself is in grave danger in that particular area, for the next month to month and a half. Not so much a case of hawks going after dogs as food, as trying to make them choose a different area to frolic in. But I'm sure if they managed to kill a small dog, they wouldn't let it go to waste.

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post #35 of 35

I just wrote this on another thread just an hour or two ago.  I will repeat it here.  

 

In my first response I suggested that if you use gill net, to stretch it it tightly so as to NOT get the hawk entangled.  Well, now I think you might want to get him entangled!  

 

Here is a couple of links to companies that sell the webbing without floats or weights.  All you are paying for is webbing.  It costs somewhere in the neighborhood of $10.00 a pound or $.38 cents a foot.  I can't remember how much you get in a pound.  But,  the smaller the line is and, the larger the mesh is, the more net you get per pound.  

 

You obviously want the smallest diameter line to prevent him from seeing it.  The mesh is measured in two ways on the chart.  The length and width of the square and the measurement of the mesh stretched diagonally.

 

This company sells webbing by the pound.

 

 http://www.louisianasportnets.com/4mono.htm

 

If you need to talk to someone, they are really fine folks.  Remember, lighter line and larger mesh means more net per pound.

 

Here is a company that sells monofilament webbing by the foot.

 

https://fishnetco.com/component/content/article?id=93:monofilament-flag-nets

 

Here is how I would rig a net to CATCH a hawk.  First, you'd have to make the net easy to detach from the pole.  Here's how you do it;  Run a heavier string from the top of the pole (drill a hole to tie through) down as far as the net is deep.  Run the string through the spring hole in a dozen or so clothes pins.  Tie a knot around the top clothes pin on each end of the net to prevent the whole thing from slinking down to the ground.  

 

Tie the string off now at the point where the bottom of the net meets the pole (another hole drilled to tie through).  At this point you have a pole with a string running down the length of it, as far as the net is deep.  There is  a bunch of clothespins strung onto the string.  The only clothespin that doesn't slide along the string is the very top one on each pole.  Do the same thing on the other end of your net.  Now you clip one end of your webbing to the "jaws" of the clothes pins of one pole.  And do the same on the other pole.  

 

You won't be able to stretch it tightly because the net will pull free of the jaws of the clothes pins if you have too much tension.

 

When the hawk hits the net, the net will pull free from the clothes pins, wrap around the hawk and drop like a sack-a-patatas!

 

You would probably be able to get several folks here to sorta "rent" the rig from you, to help with the costs.  Like I say here at times.  It wouldn't take long for a net to pay for itself when you consider the cost of the chicks, feed, meds and time spent raising them.


Edited by bigoledude - 5/13/16 at 12:46am

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Married 46 years. Great wife, 4 sons, 13 grandchildren! 

 

He who laughs last thinks slowest!


Give me ambiguity or give me something else.   

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