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Fighting with oposums - Page 3

post #21 of 29

Opossums are low risk for having rabies, but not zero risk.  The CDC reports three confirmed rabid opossums in 2014.  It's illegal, and unkind at least, to relocate most wildlife species.  Here in Michigan, you can move a trapped critter either on your own property, or to another private property within your county, with landowner permission.  The relocated animal will have to try to move home again, or struggle to fit into another territory, and knows about chickens and traps.  Mary

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsan1a View Post
 

Not the same one twice I assure you, if PETA heard of me killing a opossum they would try to put me in jail.

In the not so distant past if it was not for the lowly possum half the people in Nawth East Jawja would have starved.  Tell PETA to get over themselves, you are in a no win situation.  PETA would much rather put you and everyone else on this forum up against the wall (with or without a blindfold) for the horrid crime of keeping chickens.

 

I also would like to second and third Mary's and Ole Roster's remarks.

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

Opossums are low risk for having rabies, but not zero risk.  The CDC reports three confirmed rabid opossums in 2014.  It's illegal, and unkind at least, to relocate most wildlife species.  Here in Michigan, you can move a trapped critter either on your own property, or to another private property within your county, with landowner permission.  The relocated animal will have to try to move home again, or struggle to fit into another territory, and knows about chickens and traps.  Mary


​Pythons in South Florida have traveled 200 miles to return to their old stomping grounds.  If an animal without legs can manage that feat in only a few weeks how much faster can a possum get back to your chicken coop by using 4 legs.

Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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Keep your chickens safe from predators, buy and wear fur. 
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post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

Welcome!  Building that Ft. Knox coop and run is something that just has to happen, or things only get worse over time.  Please don't trap critters and move them elsewhere!!!  It's illegal almost everywhere, because of disease transmission, and it doesn't do any favors to the trapped animal. Either trap and shoot, or don't trap.  Mary 

 

Depending on where the op lives, trapping and moving a possum is not illegal.  I know for a fact it is not illegal in my area.  I used to work with animal control and it was done quite often.

 

A quick call to the local DNR or Animal Control could tell you if it's legal in your area, op.


Edited by GAchickennewbie - 4/21/16 at 12:46pm
Unconditional love is a gift worth giving.
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Unconditional love is a gift worth giving.
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post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by citygirlfarmer3 View Post
 

None of these answers are encouraging to me.  When checking the nest box yesterday, I was met with the face of an opossum.  I went hysterical and locked it inside until my husband came home.  When he looked the nest box door he found a MOTHER opossum all comfy with at least six babies sleeping in the box.  They didn't stir while he assessed the situation.  She finally moved to the sleeping area of the box and left 4 babies we could grab.  Oh my they were so cute but I don't want opossums eating my eggs or my chickens.   I found no local laws on rehoming and we took her and the babies about 5 miles away.   I have not let the girls out this morning.  We have some 7 week old chick besides the big girls.  We have 12 guineas, one RR rooster and a dog and none gave an alarm.  I told them all they should have been doing a better job.

 

Becky in Arkansas

I just wanted to say thanks for sharing. I never considered checking the coop before locking everybody in. Now I have 1 more piece of info to help protect my flock. 

post #26 of 29

I relocate every possum and skunk I see...to wherever they go with a bullet in their head.


Edited by TerryH - 4/26/16 at 8:25am

Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

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Our coop build thread...

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1088771/cheryls-hen-house

 

1Peter 5:2 Care for the flock that God has entrusted to you. Watch over it willingly, not grudgingly—not for what you will get out of it, but because you are eager to serve God.

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post #27 of 29

TerryH, good answer. No suffering for the animal and no more problem. It certainly wouldn't be humane to let them keep attacking you flock.

post #28 of 29

I will not tire in responding to those who criticize those of us who kill predators. In this age of a demented politically correct attitudes, some try to equate the lives of an animal with that of humans.  That premise is ridiculous!  Like Mick Dodge says "Do vegetarians not eat meat because they love animals?  Do they hate vegetables?"  It's not nearly as ridiculous a statement as the PC crowd has you believing.  If you eat meat, yet vilify me for killing a possum.....

 

Again, people say "They are wild and just doing what comes natural to them".  This is absolutely true.  They must kill to survive.  It is precisely for this reason I kill predators.  They will not stop killing your stock until you kill them or you spend a small fortune barricading your stock into impregnable fortresses. 

 

For 165,000 years mankind has protected himself and his stock by killing those animals that would prey on him/his.  It took this generation of idiots to equate the life of a stinkin animal with something far beyond reality.  The thought of killing a coyote is being compared to killing Little Poofy Lou the Shitzu. 

 

The fact is a dead predator doesn't kill any more animals.  That is 100% effectiveness!!  And, no matter how many times the bleeding hearts hear the facts of how cruel it actually is to re-locate an animal, they will continue to perpetrate this crime against animals.  Yes, it is a crime in most areas to relocate wild animals.  Government agencies may choose to do so but, private individuals are breaking the law when doing so.  It is an animal cruelty law that they are guilty of!!! 

 

I have no qualms with building the most secure defenses you can afford.  Just like you should have no qualms with me using the approach I use.

 

In my part of the Deep South, possums kill more chickens than ALL OTHER PREDATORS COMBINED. One of their most common methods of killing chickens is pulling the chicken's head through the fencing and eating the head right off of a living chicken!!     

 

When I think of the money, effort, material and resources put into avoiding the HUMANE dispatching of these killers, it amazes me.

Married 46 years. Great wife, 4 sons, 13 grandchildren! 

 

He who laughs last thinks slowest!


Give me ambiguity or give me something else.   

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Married 46 years. Great wife, 4 sons, 13 grandchildren! 

 

He who laughs last thinks slowest!


Give me ambiguity or give me something else.   

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post #29 of 29

Bigoledude- I couldn't agree more. I am no bleeding heart and definitely not liberal. I do believe in doing my part. I don't bother things in their own environment, but once they're invading my space that changes. Still, if I do kill something, even a bug, I make sure it dead not suffering. I am prepared to defend my home and my animals. While I might not be able to hit a moving target with my pistol. With a rifle maybe. But yes, a clean shot is humane. I have neighbors pretty close (all 1 acre properties), so whatever we do has to also be safe for them. It definitely is not humane to let them keep killing or maiming your animals. And I already stated how I felt about relocation, the same.

 

I put half inch hardware cloth on my run to avoid the whole chicken head eating thing because I had been warned. I free range during the day. Well, my chickens do anyways...

 

Trust and believe that when we have an issue with a predator, they will also be relocated to wherever they go with a bullet in their head. My hubby practices all the time and will have no problem placing a head shot on a moving target. We are also prepared to protect ourselves from human predators. The "zombie Apocalypse" will be your neighbors coming to get your food and water after some natural disaster.

 

Yes I eat meat, but hate the way the industry raises and processes. After you kill the opossum you could eat it, the circle of life. I've never eaten opossum.

 

Also, your signature indicates that you have been blessed with a beautiful family. Congratulations!

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