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Deworming on a Regular Basis?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I did not know until recently that you are suppose to deworm your chickens regularly, and I recently loss one of my hens to worms. I would like to deworm the rest of the chickens right now, but having never done so before, I would like some advice. I have Wazine, Valbazen and Rooster Booster at my house right now. What is best to begin with, how much should I give them, and how regularly?

post #2 of 7
I have been keeping chickens for over 20 years and don't worm my chickens. So it's not a requirement.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 7

True, it's not a requirement, but if a person has experienced problems with worms and wants to avoid that in the future then it's probably a good idea.  I deworm my birds 2-3 times a year and I regularly have birds living 7 to 10 years of age.   When I first started with chickens back in '95 I knew nothing of deworming them until we started seeing some health issues and consulted an avian vet who did fecal tests and showed us what kind of worm loads our birds were carrying around.  Since then I've been deworming a couple times a year and we don't see worm overloads anymore.   There have been no worm overloads in the birds I've had necropsied.  So for me, that is something we will continue to do.  Worms are very damaging and I'd rather deworm then deal with health issues. 

 

Valbazen is a very good wormer, give 1/2 cc to standard size birds, 1/4 cc to bantams.  Repeat the dose in 10 days since wormers do not get rid of worm eggs.  

wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
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post #4 of 7
My chickens live that long too, as in every species that is wormed regularly the worms will build up a resistance to the wormers and they will eventually not work.
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #5 of 7
Rotating dewormer's and deworming minimally is a good way to help prevent resistance. Personally I will deworm a couple times a year with different dewormers in order to keep worm loads from getting out of hand. I have seen the effects of worm overload and I prefer not to go there again.
wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
Reply
wife to long suffering husband who has built more miles of fence, barns, coops and enclosures then one man should have to, two teenage boys, current flock of 13 assorted hens, 1 big red roo and a list of other assorted farm animals. 
Reply
post #6 of 7

It has a lot to do with climate. I'm sure if I lived in a constantly warm moist climate, I'd worm on a schedule.

However, after thousands of chickens, I've only wormed 5 and never on a regular schedule.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #7 of 7

I'm sure chickens aren't any different than any other animal that gets worms... horses, goats, dogs, cats.. etc.  If they GET worms, in my opinion, they need to be treated.  The worms will take over a body making it difficult for the animal to absorb nutrients.

 

I know nothing of worming chickens....  but I'm learning.... :)

Throw me to the wolves, and I'll come back. Leading the pack.....

 

~ Jeremiah 29:11 ~ 

 "For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

 

*~*Jennifer*~*

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Throw me to the wolves, and I'll come back. Leading the pack.....

 

~ Jeremiah 29:11 ~ 

 "For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

 

*~*Jennifer*~*

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