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Roost

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So i have my roost higher then my nesting boxes by about 4 feet but they still wont roost there. Its a new coop to them as well. Any suggestions.
post #2 of 7

so what is the height of the roost you only said how much higher than the nests they were, and what breeds do you have if they are heavier then they may not like getting up there

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
5' roost .. Wyandotte and golden comet
post #4 of 7
Maybe they need a little ladder to get up that high.
post #5 of 7

the comets will have no trouble the wyandotte's are heavier they may not like that height and because the W's are on the floor the comets think they have to join them.

post #6 of 7

Height of roost can depend on width/length of coop...and the landing area it provides.

My coop is a narrow 6' and roost is about 3' high, not much room to 'fly' down....some do, but most use the ramp - especially the bigger birds.

 

Here's my theory on the 'stack up' aspect to coop design:

Bottom of pop door should be about 8" above floor so bedding doesn't get dragged out of coop.

Nice to have bottom of nests about 18" above bedding to allow use of that floor space under them(doesn't count if your nests are mounted on outside of coop).

Roosts should be about 12" higher than nests so birds won't roost(sleep) in nests and poop in them.

Upper venting should be as high as possible above roosts so no strong drafts hit roosts in winter...and hot/moist air and ammonia can rise and exit coop.

 

 

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info.. My flock has started using there roost.. i guess they just needed time
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