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poor production

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Looking for assistance.  I have nine buff Orpington layers beginning their second year.  We are in Virginia. Coming out of winter they have yet to change to improved production from a total of 2 to 3 eggs sometimes every other day.  They appear to be in good health, plumage is good.  They have been getting DuMor Poultry laying pellets or crumbles along with oyster shells for calcium.  I have recently added some cat food and scraps of left over venison.  I can't figure out what else to do.  Others around me are getting much better production from their layers without the extras.  Have I perhaps acquired a flock of poor quality? 

post #2 of 3
Buff Orpingtons lay around 3-5 eggs a week, so you aren't that far off production as far as breed. I tried Dumor once but my birds didn't care for it, I personally feed an all flock instead of a layer for that extra bit of protein, it seems to have helped my flock, a good 18-20% protein with oyster shells on the side. Hens are just beginning to pick up laying steam and you should see an increase in the next few months until it gets too hot which will slow some down. Do the others have your breed? And what are they feeding?
Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
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Chickens, muscovy ducks, turkeys, donkeys , goats, dogs, fish, parakeets, a parrot, and a cat.

Chickens and dogs are healing to the soul.

I brake for squirrels.

Some of my birds.
http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/my-wisconsin-flock
Reply
post #3 of 3

Agrees more protein might help.

Do they free range?

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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