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light in brooder

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
My brooder is in our garage and I have a 250 watt heatlamp. The bulb in the heatlamp is sort of clear in the middle and red around the edges. Should I be turning off the light for a time each day, so that they have some darkness? As far as heat goes we have been in the 50's during the day and 40's at night, and our garage is not really insulated (but not drafty). My chicks are all between 1 to 2 weeks old. Thanks!
post #2 of 6

I switch to a ceramic heat emitter at night.  It produces heat but no light;  you can buy them at pet supply stores with a reptile section,

post #3 of 6
I use a white 250watt bulb during the daylight hours and switch to a red at night. Be careful on the bulb life though, i too have 1-2 week old chicks in my uninsulated garage and last night between 11pm and 7am this morning, my red bulb burned out. I sure hope they are ok as my garage was 55 last night.

Good luck to you.
post #4 of 6

Over the last 20 years, we've raised tens of thousands of chicks, all of which are moved out to grass pasture eventually. Virtually all of them were brooded with electric lamp brooders that were on 24 hours a day. Red heat lamps, clear heat lamps, red floodlights, clear floodlights-- we've used them all. The results seem the same no matter what we use, so now we mostly buy red and white indiscriminately (whatever's on sale)..

 

Cannibalistic strains of chickens are less murderous with red light than otherwise. We've learned to avoid these, so it's not an issue for us.But because of this one issue, it's probably wise for beginners to start with red lamps.

 

In terms of maintaining natural daylight hours, I haven't seen any sign that it's important during the brooding period. During the laying period, yes. During the brooding period, no.

 

Robert

Robert Plamondon * Norton Creek Press, Blodgett Oregon * Latest Reprint: Turkey Management by Marsden & Martin * Most Popular: Fresh-Air Poultry Houses by Dr. Woods. See my Chicken FAQ, too.
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Robert Plamondon * Norton Creek Press, Blodgett Oregon * Latest Reprint: Turkey Management by Marsden & Martin * Most Popular: Fresh-Air Poultry Houses by Dr. Woods. See my Chicken FAQ, too.
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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertPlamondon View Post

Over the last 20 years, we've raised tens of thousands of chicks, all of which are moved out to grass pasture eventually. Virtually all of them were brooded with electric lamp brooders that were on 24 hours a day. Red heat lamps, clear heat lamps, red floodlights, clear floodlights-- we've used them all. The results seem the same no matter what we use, so now we mostly buy red and white indiscriminately (whatever's on sale)..

Cannibalistic strains of chickens are less murderous with red light than otherwise. We've learned to avoid these, so it's not an issue for us.But because of this one issue, it's probably wise for beginners to start with red lamps.

In terms of maintaining natural daylight hours, I haven't seen any sign that it's important during the brooding period. During the laying period, yes. During the brooding period, no.

Robert

Thank you.
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thank you everyone. I think I will just let them be with the light I have at least for now.
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