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Guinea Fowl

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

If I were to raise 2 guinea fowl right now would they survive there is not any snow on the ground right now, because it's early spring.

post #2 of 9
Hi welcome-byc.gif

Glad you could join us here! I'm sure they would be fine if you were thinking of adult Guinea fowl. Keets would need to be brooded what ever the weatber. I'm not a keeper of them myself but I see you have found the Guinea section where I'm sure the keepers there will be able to help you.

Wishing you the very best of luck and enjoy BYC frow.gif
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

But I am thinking of keets

post #5 of 9
Keets would need to be brooded under heat. Check out this section of the learning centre ~ http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/other-backyard-poultry-ducks-quail-turkeys-geese-etc There are a few articles on Guinea and how to raise them.
post #6 of 9

:welcome

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post #7 of 9
frow.gif Hello again! smile.png
Did a moth know that the flame was going to change her life forever, or did she simply fly towards that heated embrace, knowing it would offer her something she couldn't give herself? In the end, the answer didn't really matter. The moth had never wanted the choice. -Joey W. Hill-
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Did a moth know that the flame was going to change her life forever, or did she simply fly towards that heated embrace, knowing it would offer her something she couldn't give herself? In the end, the answer didn't really matter. The moth had never wanted the choice. -Joey W. Hill-
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post #8 of 9

Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)

I set fire to the rain! Watch it pour as I, touched your face. Well it burn while I cried, because I heard it screaming out your name. And I threw us into flames. I knew that was the last time, the last time...I set fire to the rain! -Adele

 

Look at my flock page! http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bantamfan4lifes-flock

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I set fire to the rain! Watch it pour as I, touched your face. Well it burn while I cried, because I heard it screaming out your name. And I threw us into flames. I knew that was the last time, the last time...I set fire to the rain! -Adele

 

Look at my flock page! http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/bantamfan4lifes-flock

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post #9 of 9

Guinea keets should be fine as long as you keep them under a heat lamp, but make sure they have enough room to get out from under the heat if they get too hot. Also, make sure they have easy access to food. I use 22% game bird crumble because they need more protein than chickens.  I have always heard not to use the medicated chick starter for guinea keets as they eat more food than chicks and process it differently and can get sick and die if given the medicated crumble.  You also want to make sure they always have chick grit and water. If they are really young, you may want to add marbles to the water so they will not fall in and drown.  Personally, I love having guineas...they are great for bug/tick control. Mine go through my garden and pick off the bugs but do not eat any of the plants/vegetables. During spring, summer, and fall, they are prolific egg layers.  Their eggs are about the size of a small chicken egg and have a very hard shell, but they are great for baking with a really rich flavor.  All of my hens seem to be very fertile and so far they have all been great mothers and do well raising the keets on their own. As for the males, they seem to actually participate in helping to raise the young keets and are very gentle with them.  I will say, though, that they are much harder to tame than your average chicken and quite a bit more of a wild personality.  Good luck!

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