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My worst incubation experience ever? Should I just assume they're all dead?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Back when I was 12-17, I had a still air incubator that I converted with the forced air kit and I was like the incubation czar. Then, I stopped. And this month, I attempted to incubate for the first time since, in a little giant forced air I'd never used, but got in high school, with a turner I had. And I have had nothing but problems. 

 

1. Because most of the eggs in there are from eBay, I wanted to wait until they were all here to set them (STUPID, I know), and have the incubator test run for a couple days. This is also the first time I've incubated since having a full time job, and somehow setting the eggs kept getting put off and put off. Most of them waited a WEEK after arriving to be set. Dumbest thing ever. How much does that decrease my hatch rate by? 50%? More?

 

2. Got them in there, and cups keep falling out of the turner. This turner you have to set a lot of pressure on (enough to likely break it), to secure the cups, and I thought they were all secure, but still cups with some of the larger eggs fall, dropping the eggs, and worse, sometimes jamming that entire row of eggs. Since I work, I only go in there, and I have no idea how long all 5 eggs in that row have been stuck like that and not turned. And isn't turning the most important in the first week?

 

3. I candled laaaate last night for the first time (eggs are 6 days, 5 days and 3 days respectively), and felt like an utter failure. I definitely remember what a blood ring looks like, but I think there were still signs of life in some. When I went to candle, I discovered my water tray had run dry. Panicked and ran and got a glass--which I thought was room temperature--and added it. Came back 6 hours later (when i woke up) just now, and the temp in there was at 95.5. Will that kill them to be low for 6 hours?

 

At this point, given all my rookie mistakes and stupidity, should I just assume they're all dead in here?

 

Also, are green eggs notoriously hard to candle? Green eggs would be at day 5, and there were definitely some that were infertile with that bacteria dot thing going that I remember, but others, I completely could not see inside except maybe the air cell (and these eggs are the same shade of green, so it's not shell differences). The green eggs are from one of my new laying hens, who lived with a rooster when I got her--eggs were just sitting in the basket on the counter for a couple weeks, not even the right way up, and I threw them in just for giggles. Could these possibly be fertile?

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilkieLover01 View Post
 

Back when I was 12-17, I had a still air incubator that I converted with the forced air kit and I was like the incubation czar. Then, I stopped. And this month, I attempted to incubate for the first time since, in a little giant forced air I'd never used, but got in high school, with a turner I had. And I have had nothing but problems. 

 

1. Because most of the eggs in there are from eBay, I wanted to wait until they were all here to set them (STUPID, I know), and have the incubator test run for a couple days. This is also the first time I've incubated since having a full time job, and somehow setting the eggs kept getting put off and put off. Most of them waited a WEEK after arriving to be set. Dumbest thing ever. How much does that decrease my hatch rate by? 50%? More?

 

2. Got them in there, and cups keep falling out of the turner. This turner you have to set a lot of pressure on (enough to likely break it), to secure the cups, and I thought they were all secure, but still cups with some of the larger eggs fall, dropping the eggs, and worse, sometimes jamming that entire row of eggs. Since I work, I only go in there, and I have no idea how long all 5 eggs in that row have been stuck like that and not turned. And isn't turning the most important in the first week?

 

3. I candled laaaate last night for the first time (eggs are 6 days, 5 days and 3 days respectively), and felt like an utter failure. I definitely remember what a blood ring looks like, but I think there were still signs of life in some. When I went to candle, I discovered my water tray had run dry. Panicked and ran and got a glass--which I thought was room temperature--and added it. Came back 6 hours later (when i woke up) just now, and the temp in there was at 95.5. Will that kill them to be low for 6 hours?

 

At this point, given all my rookie mistakes and stupidity, should I just assume they're all dead in here?

 

Also, are green eggs notoriously hard to candle? Green eggs would be at day 5, and there were definitely some that were infertile with that bacteria dot thing going that I remember, but others, I completely could not see inside except maybe the air cell (and these eggs are the same shade of green, so it's not shell differences). The green eggs are from one of my new laying hens, who lived with a rooster when I got her--eggs were just sitting in the basket on the counter for a couple weeks, not even the right way up, and I threw them in just for giggles. Could these possibly be fertile?

Ok, Let me start backwards. Yes, green eggs can be almost as big of a pain as teh dark brown to see into. After the first 3-4 days I can't see hardly anything in my green eggs. Usually I can make out a vein or two around the air cell to assure myself that they are still kicking.

 

Next, yeah, LG's are not made for people that work or are away from home a lot. They are more teh "babysitting" type of bator. Which model is it? Is it the 9200?

 

Humidity:   I actually run dry when possible. I like 30% for humidity. I too have an Little Giant. In  most cases that I see people who use 45% + end up with low hatach rates due to drowning.

 

I would give them until day 10 before I judged whether they were viable or not.  

Could they be fertile? Yes, they could be fertile. 

 

No 95 for 6 hours shouldn't kill them, (unless they are weak to begin with), but it might result in a slight delay.

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

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post #3 of 8

Oh and from about day 3-14 is the most important time for turning. That doesn't mean that those eggs are a loss, but if they failed to develop or develop right, it wouldn't be hard to assume that lack of turning could have it's effects.

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
post #4 of 8

Also shipped eggs are the hardest.  The post office shaking and dropping the boxes can cause unseen damage to eggs, so it's totally normal to have a higher percentage not start at all or quit at various stages all the way through lockdown.

 

All we can do is give it our best shot.  (Of 18 shipped eggs, I'm down to 6 with three of those looking iffy.  This is in a rock-solid incubator with my local eggs that are doing great.)

 

I wouldn't give up on them totally since you still might get a few to hatch.  Wait till day 10 or so to make your decisions.

 

Good luck!

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke
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The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke
Reply
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmyLynn2374 View Post
 

Ok, Let me start backwards. Yes, green eggs can be almost as big of a pain as teh dark brown to see into. After the first 3-4 days I can't see hardly anything in my green eggs. Usually I can make out a vein or two around the air cell to assure myself that they are still kicking.

 

Next, yeah, LG's are not made for people that work or are away from home a lot. They are more teh "babysitting" type of bator. Which model is it? Is it the 9200?

 

Humidity:   I actually run dry when possible. I like 30% for humidity. I too have an Little Giant. In  most cases that I see people who use 45% + end up with low hatach rates due to drowning.

 

I would give them until day 10 before I judged whether they were viable or not.  

Could they be fertile? Yes, they could be fertile. 

 

No 95 for 6 hours shouldn't kill them, (unless they are weak to begin with), but it might result in a slight delay.

I feel a lot better about my failure now. 

Mine is apparently a 10200 model? What do you know about that one?

This is the only one carried by CAL Ranch, TSC or the feedstore here. Except for this farm innovators or something or other one? Anyone ever heard of/used that one?

 

Meanwhile the fun continues. Over the weekend it went rogue and ran the gamut from 95-101.7 degrees (yes, with no or minimal adjustments). I never remember anything like this. Now when the light comes on, it flickers ever so slightly? I came home from work tonight and the temp was chilling at 97.7. My thermometer IS old--it's my old standby. But it has never failed me before, it's a radio shack with brand new batteries and worked wonders for me. I trust it implicitly. 

 

I candled. Everyone is dead, didnt develop at all, or is bacterial dots. And then I get to the very last egg..One of the homegrowns. And low and behold, alive. And moving to try to get away from the flashlight beam. 

 

Should I invest in a hovabator and try again? My successful 15 year old self would be so disgusted right now.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilkieLover01 View Post
 

I feel a lot better about my failure now. 

Mine is apparently a 10200 model? What do you know about that one?

This is the only one carried by CAL Ranch, TSC or the feedstore here. Except for this farm innovators or something or other one? Anyone ever heard of/used that one?

 

Meanwhile the fun continues. Over the weekend it went rogue and ran the gamut from 95-101.7 degrees (yes, with no or minimal adjustments). I never remember anything like this. Now when the light comes on, it flickers ever so slightly? I came home from work tonight and the temp was chilling at 97.7. My thermometer IS old--it's my old standby. But it has never failed me before, it's a radio shack with brand new batteries and worked wonders for me. I trust it implicitly. 

 

I candled. Everyone is dead, didnt develop at all, or is bacterial dots. And then I get to the very last egg..One of the homegrowns. And low and behold, alive. And moving to try to get away from the flashlight beam. 

 

Should I invest in a hovabator and try again? My successful 15 year old self would be so disgusted right now.

Not familiar with the 10200, but looked it up and it sounds like the 9300 and 10300. I TSC carries the 9300 and the Farm Innovators. The FI has split reviews. Better than the LG subpar to the Hovabator. While most people hate the digital controlled LG's the FI has people that hate it and people that love it.  If you could get a Hovabator, I'd highly recommend that one over any other styro.


Edited by AmyLynn2374 - 3/30/16 at 5:19am

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply

Need help incubating/hatching? Are you more a hands on hatcher? Come visit us: http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1081034/hands-on-hatching-and-help

A guide to hatching from the hands on perspective: http://hatching411.weebly.com/

Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
UPDATE: I am proud to report that yesterday was day 21 (for most of the eggs) and that homegrown egg--the egg that was alive and well when I candled a couple weeks ago--hatched
Edited by SilkieLover01 - 4/9/16 at 1:14pm
post #8 of 8
Hooray for the little one!
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke
Reply
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke
Reply
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