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When do Roos have to go? - Page 2

post #11 of 17

a couple of things to judge in your picking of a rooster. Check his feet, the toes should be straight, the legs should be strong and well developed. Watch the bird walk, again it should have an even gait. Pick the rooster up, and feel his body, find his breast bone, pull out each wing, again looking for conformity, balance and even both sides development. Check the beak, how it closes, it needs to align well. Look at the scull, is it wide, is it eve. The feathers should be bright and full.

 

One can check the standards of the breed, I learned a lot, by just reading an article on here about the standards of the Buck-eye breed. Each breed has a bit different requirements as to shape and color, but the above are good traits to look for in all animals if one is using them for breeding, one should start with a physically sound bird.

 

Or keep the one that is the nicest!

 

Mrs K

 

ps - I agree with pulling them out of the flock about 8-10 weeks of age. If you had a mature rooster over the flock, you could keep them a bit longer, but if this is a flock of chicks growing up together without any adult chickens to keep them in line, very often roosters get to be jerks.

Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. K View Post

a couple of things to judge in your picking of a rooster. Check his feet, the toes should be straight, the legs should be strong and well developed. Watch the bird walk, again it should have an even gait. Pick the rooster up, and feel his body, find his breast bone, pull out each wing, again looking for conformity, balance and even both sides development. Check the beak, how it closes, it needs to align well. Look at the scull, is it wide, is it eve. The feathers should be bright and full.

One can check the standards of the breed, I learned a lot, by just reading an article on here about the standards of the Buck-eye breed. Each breed has a bit different requirements as to shape and color, but the above are good traits to look for in all animals if one is using them for breeding, one should start with a physically sound bird.

Or keep the one that is the nicest!

Mrs K

ps - I agree with pulling them out of the flock about 8-10 weeks of age. If you had a mature rooster over the flock, you could keep them a bit longer, but if this is a flock of chicks growing up together without any adult chickens to keep them in line, very often roosters get to be jerks.

Thank you, Mrs K for all your advice! This is indeed a brand new flock all chosen and growing up together. They will be 9 weeks old on Friday and I am beginning to notice behaviors.

Of the ones that are roosters, I have 3 breeds to choose from. I have 1 white leghorn roo who is the acting alpha at the moment. He developed quickly and has been crowing for about 2 weeks already. I believe I have 3 male buff orpingtons but only one is crowing, and I think I have 2 male Rhode Island reds of which I believe one of them is so pretty but I'm just speaking feather colors. I will read up on them and breed standards and look closer at the things you are mentioning!
post #13 of 17

So glad this question was asked.  I was wanting to know the same thing. Very helpful.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
5 of the supposed roosters went back to where they came from. He turns around and sends them to auction. We ended up keeping the white leghorn.
post #15 of 17

One of my hens hatched a dozen.  It was our first hatch.  I was so excited watching the chicks grow.  Unfortunately, I wasn't able to spend as much time with them as our first flock of chicks that we purchased - so they have not warmed up to me like the hand raised chicks. 

 

6 of them were cockerels.  After about 16 weeks they started to try to mate the hens.  No crowing yet... 

 

Yesterday we dropped the cockerels off in the forest we own behind the house.  I brought them food and water and checked up on them.  Within 24 hours the foxes/coyotes had taken them.

 

 

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaitanm24 View Post


Being that I don't know what breed perfection would be, I have no idea what I'm looking for or against. We were considering keeping our white leghorn. He has matured the fastest and seems to be the alpha as of right now.

You are right, Leghorns mature super fast and are super hormonal. Their testes take up an in ordinate amount of internal organ space and make the case for testosterone toxicity in the brain. Do your self a favor and eat him at about 14 weeks old. Split him and grill him. Your leghorns may have to go first as they get to be bullies before the dual purpose breeds start to feel puberty. Sure he is prettier right now but the other boy are just late bloomers. Trust me when I say the leghorn cockerel peaks at about 14 weeks. 

In all roosters the young guys feel the need to proove them selves to each other. They do sort out a "pecking order" but thats usually done by about 10 weeks. If you want a calm flock and don't want to hear crowing all day every day or to get attacked by a rooster crazed with testosterone, don't have a leghorn rooster and get down to one roo as before the real fighting STARTS.

I am not talking about the sparring that last a minute and they both loose interest but fighting where one bird won't relent until the other bird is dead.

Good luck. 

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJ View Post

You are right, Leghorns mature super fast and are super hormonal. Their testes take up an in ordinate amount of internal organ space and make the case for testosterone toxicity in the brain. Do your self a favor and eat him at about 14 weeks old. Split him and grill him. Your leghorns may have to go first as they get to be bullies before the dual purpose breeds start to feel puberty. Sure he is prettier right now but the other boy are just late bloomers. Trust me when I say the leghorn cockerel peaks at about 14 weeks. 
In all roosters the young guys feel the need to proove them selves to each other. They do sort out a "pecking order" but thats usually done by about 10 weeks. If you want a calm flock and don't want to hear crowing all day every day or to get attacked by a rooster crazed with testosterone, don't have a leghorn rooster and get down to one roo as before the real fighting STARTS.
I am not talking about the sparring that last a minute and they both loose interest but fighting where one bird won't relent until the other bird is dead.
Good luck. 

I do believe I have all the other roosters gone now! I had multiple crowing and just sparring happening at 7-8 weeks. I knew I had to move! I think I have 8 hens and then the leghorn roo now and the flock is happier already. Personally I would have kept the buff or RIR roo, but I let the hubby choose and told him the first time I get attacked by a rooster, that would be a dead rooster no matter who chose him. Right now he is ok. He comes up to us but doesn't care to be touched like the hens. We shall see.
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