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Should I turn my eggs in the first 24 hours in an incubator???

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I have a new Brinsea Octagon incubator that I thought had an automatic turner but when it got it here it didn't.  I know for the first 24 hours you are not supposed to remove the lid, but without a turner the eggs stay in the same position.  Should I leave them locked down for the first 24 hours and wait to start turning them until then or should I be turning them throughout the first 24 hours?

post #2 of 6
Do you know why you are not supposed to remove the lid for the first 24 hours? They may have a reason but that really sounds strange to me. I can understand getting it set up and letting it stabilize before you put the eggs in, but that just does not sound right. You can call Brinsea and ask them.

Personally I’d be turning those eggs.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #3 of 6

Back in the 80's I hatched out a LOT of Button quail from my Hovabator still air. No internet back then so when I started I just followed the instructions and I opened that thing many times a day to turn the eggs and had a 90-100% hatch rate


now 30 years later I'm getting back into birds and have read so much totally conflicting advice online it's a wonder any newbie ever manages to do anything

 

While I am sure this is simply a case of many ways to do a job and still be right I bet it is really overwhelming.

 

I'm starting incubating eggs next week in a brand new Hovabator and you can be sure I will be opening the thing many times a day to turn eggs again

Diane

 

D's Birds & Bees

Working Class Canine Wildlife Recovery

Frontier Rottweilers

Dogs by Diane Portraits

 

Barnevelders, Crested Cream Legbars, Delawares

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Diane

 

D's Birds & Bees

Working Class Canine Wildlife Recovery

Frontier Rottweilers

Dogs by Diane Portraits

 

Barnevelders, Crested Cream Legbars, Delawares

Reply
post #4 of 6
Rottlady, I fully agree with you. One of the problems is that there are so many different ways to do things that you have too many options. There is no one right way to do something where every other way is wrong. Sometimes there are reasons to do certain things, that’s why I like to ask why. Or if you go a certain way you need to do other things to compensate. Like one lady on here I like to tease about having no self-control, she is constantly opening her incubator during lockdown but she keeps her lockdown humidity high to compensate. BigWeenMachine I do not believe you need to do that just to turn the eggs. Lockdown is different than regular incubation.

Another problem that you see on here a lot is that things are often taken out of context. We all keep chickens or other birds in totally different conditions for different goals. What works for me might be a disaster for someone else. A lot of times it’s difficult to understand the context of someone’s comment so you don’t know if it applies to you or not.

I don’t know why someone said to not open it for 24 hours. To me it sounds like nonsense, but I don’t have that incubator.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
post #5 of 6
Isn't the brinsea octagon designed to not be opened? Pretty sure that instead of turning the individual eggs you're supposed to pivot the entire unit, hence the design.
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Lol, you guys hit it right on the head.  There is soooo much conflicting info on the web that I have no clue what to believe and what not to believe.  Those eggs have been in there for about 16 hours now without being turned so I am just gonna start turning them.  Sometimes the internet makes a task ten times harder than it needs to be.

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