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New Chick won't sleep in the coop

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hi guys,
When I first set my 2 new chicks into the chicken pen, they went into the coop to sleep. That was about 3 weeks ago. Last week I noticed that they are now sleeping up on top of the door of the coop. (Door is just 2ft by 2 ft)They are together. There are 3 grown hens inside the coop and they each sleep on their own bars. Each bar has enough length for about 3 chickens.
Twice I have picked them up and put them inside the coop. They slept on the floor. I can't help but wonder if "Big Birtha" is not letting them in the coop. She is sort of stationed by the door and can easily peck anything that comes in.

What can I do? Should I just let it be?
post #2 of 6
If it were me I'd probably just let it play out as long as there are no other problems. How old are the chicks?
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
They are just over 2 months.
post #4 of 6
You could try placing them on the roosts after dark. If the coop is not lighted and you put them on a roost next to each other they will most likely stay till morning. Or you can just let them figure it out. I doubt it's a bullying problem. They are still pretty young.
post #5 of 6

Two month old chicks and full grown hens often do not mix well. Your chicks are getting hazed by the dominant hen.

 

If you can, it may be best to keep these chicks separate for at least another month with wire in between the two groups so that the older hens can see the younger but not have access.

 

Integrating younger birds into an existing flock usually takes time. The younger birds will be hazed for a time (often a week or two, or longer). The worst times are at the feeders and roosting time. To help with that, provide feeders in different locations and even different locations for roosting. Then allow integration during the day in open yard time. After awhile, you'll find the groups mixing at night too.

 

As they mingle during the day, you will have to provide places for the younger birds to run and hide until they are accepted by the flock. Remove any older flock member that is overly aggressive in hazing (ie draws blood or holds younger birds down and pounds away pecking).

 

You will see the new pullets hazed most heavily until they come into lay, then often they integrate (after a few squabbles over the nests). The adult laying hormones often give confidence to the younger birds.

 

LofMc


Edited by Lady of McCamley - 4/1/16 at 11:50pm
Keeper of 15+ layers, common to specialty types for colorful egg baskets. Brooding Queens: The Queen Mum Silkie and 2 Bantam Cochin handmaids. Preparing to breed my own Olive Eggers! Barnevelder roo with Splash Marans and CL for egg color and color coding :D Former 4H leader, GDB Puppy Raiser, Homeschooler. Current ESL tutor. Proud new grandma. Loving wife to a very tolerant husband.
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Keeper of 15+ layers, common to specialty types for colorful egg baskets. Brooding Queens: The Queen Mum Silkie and 2 Bantam Cochin handmaids. Preparing to breed my own Olive Eggers! Barnevelder roo with Splash Marans and CL for egg color and color coding :D Former 4H leader, GDB Puppy Raiser, Homeschooler. Current ESL tutor. Proud new grandma. Loving wife to a very tolerant husband.
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post #6 of 6

If they are already spending the day together without blood shed and the chicks are getting enough to eat and drink,

I would suggest putting up a separate roost a bit lower than the one the bigger birds use.

Put some sort of barrier up so she can't nail a chicks coming in the door from her roost.

Some folks have put up barriers to separate the roost(s) into 'sections'.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

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Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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