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Naked chickie

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I have a six-week-old light brahma that has almost no feathers. Today he was crying outside because he was cold. When I picked him up his feet were really cold so I brought him inside and gave him a little warm water to stand in. He seems much happier now cuddled up in a towel chilling. What should I do with him in the long run if he's not getting feathers to keep him warm?
post #2 of 8

Aww, poor little buddy! I suggest getting one of the other chicks for company and raising them inside until his feathers are more developed. 

UTAH 4-H STATE CONTEST WINNER - (1ST) 4-H DEMONSTRATIONS!! [7/17/13] - HOW TO WASH A SHOW CHICKEN 

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Whit's Flock (My Chickens) (Click to show)

 

~Whittni, a happy owner of: No chickens :( I miss them SO much! However, I'm earning a degree at university currently..in Agriculture & minor in art..then I'm off to grad school in Fall 2018.
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UTAH 4-H STATE CONTEST WINNER - (1ST) 4-H DEMONSTRATIONS!! [7/17/13] - HOW TO WASH A SHOW CHICKEN 

 - NOMINATE BYC MEMBERS FOR AWARDS HERE

Whit's Flock (My Chickens) (Click to show)

 

~Whittni, a happy owner of: No chickens :( I miss them SO much! However, I'm earning a degree at university currently..in Agriculture & minor in art..then I'm off to grad school in Fall 2018.
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
How long will it take for him to feather out?
post #4 of 8

Could it be there was a mistake in breeding???   There are all kind of secret laboratories especially in the former  Non Free Nations.  Here might be a clue to your chickens Daddy..

File source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sphinx2_July_2006.jpg


By M.Minderhoud at Dutch Wikipedia - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=935202

I cant afford a cat as this because the clothes are too expensive.   Have to stick with my ferals in my Avatar.  :gig

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
@cavemanrich nice, 😄 I've always thought those cats were rather strange looking. Thank goodness we only keep reformed ferals.
I feel bad for the naked chickie, but I think I'm just going to bring him in to soak on the evenings he gets to cold and then have him cuddle with his buddies in the coop once they go to bed.
post #6 of 8

There is s serious side to me as well.   At six weeks,  it is unusual to see bare spots like that.   Check to see if there are any mites causing this.   I know it would usually affect all your chicks, but never know.   No other idea as to what would be the cause.    Maybe a late bloomer.   On the subject of feral cats. Those you see in my avatar are indeed feral rescue...   They  are all FIXED, but they don't know it. :gig  fixed ??? whats that ???  what they don't know, they don't miss.:lau 

post #7 of 8

I've been having a similar issue with one of my six-week-old cochin bantams- he's way, WAY behind the others in feathering, with a similar pattern of patchiness. Apparently, there are genes that can cause chickens to feather out particularly slowly. That might be what you're seeing here. 

Our flock: 2 African Geese, 16 Bantam Cochins, 12 Silkies, 11 Mixed Breed Bantams, 6 Japanese Bantams, 6 D'Uccles, 1 OEGB, 1 white crested black polish, and 1 very confused pigeon.
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Our flock: 2 African Geese, 16 Bantam Cochins, 12 Silkies, 11 Mixed Breed Bantams, 6 Japanese Bantams, 6 D'Uccles, 1 OEGB, 1 white crested black polish, and 1 very confused pigeon.
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
That would be my guess. Poor thing looks like a little dinosaur when he stands up, hilarious but kind of sad. Hopefully he'll catch up soon.
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