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How to Integrate new hens

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hello! I currently have a flock, and right now its mainly roosters on accident, but we are working on getting the flock bigger, I have hens who are 10 weeks behind them, and they are still a little small, so we are waiting to integrate them.  however someone i know is giving me 3 hens that are three years old, so I was wondering what the best way to integrate them would be? thanks in advance!

post #2 of 4

Roosters will take hens in,and won't fight unless needed.So you could put EVERYBODY in there asap,see what happens.letting them fight is also a great choice,things go fatser.

I have a  few chickens.

2 barreds,named Falcon and Hawk

1 New Hampshire rooster named,Zeus

2 New Hampshire hens named,Vanillipe (One has no name)

1 silver laced Wyandotte named,Special girl

1 White Leghorn roosters named Foggy

3 black&red Sex links,(Black)angel,and one red is named little red,and the other one is Mrs.Prissy

And a few others that sadly,died

 

I have a 11 ducks.

Reply

I have a  few chickens.

2 barreds,named Falcon and Hawk

1 New Hampshire rooster named,Zeus

2 New Hampshire hens named,Vanillipe (One has no name)

1 silver laced Wyandotte named,Special girl

1 White Leghorn roosters named Foggy

3 black&red Sex links,(Black)angel,and one red is named little red,and the other one is Mrs.Prissy

And a few others that sadly,died

 

I have a 11 ducks.

Reply
post #3 of 4

A few questions...How many hens that are 10 weeks younger than the roosters?  How many roosters?  The basic rule for roosters is ONE rooster to TEN hens.  Any more roosters than that and it will be very hard on your hens.

 

#1 rule on integrating new chickens to your flock is to keep the new ones away from your flock for 30 days to ensure they won't be introducing disease to your own flock.

"When raising chickens you must think like a chicken...NOT like a human!"

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies-diseases-injuries-before-they-happen 

 

Reply

"When raising chickens you must think like a chicken...NOT like a human!"

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies-diseases-injuries-before-they-happen 

 

Reply
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridebeliever View Post
 

A few questions...How many hens that are 10 weeks younger than the roosters?  How many roosters?  The basic rule for roosters is ONE rooster to TEN hens.  Any more roosters than that and it will be very hard on your hens.

 

#1 rule on integrating new chickens to your flock is to keep the new ones away from your flock for 30 days to ensure they won't be introducing disease to your own flock.

Good questions, I would add ....how old are 'mainly roosters flock' and how old are the '10 weeks younger hens'?

 

1:10 is for fertility efficacy in commercial breeding facilities...backyard ratios can be a vary depends on ages, housing, and goals.  

 

 

Quarantine of new birds can depend on the sentimental and /or financial value of the birds.

Doing a true bio quarantine is difficult in a BY setting. 

BYC Medical Quarantine Article

Poultry Biosecurity

BYC 'medical quarantine' search

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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