BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Natural way of egg hatching
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Natural way of egg hatching

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Just wondering if people do that? Chickens I have "inherited" were "living" with the rooster for year and a half until last week when we had to remove rooster to a different farm. 

I only have chickens for the past two weeks so don't know much about them, however, I do see that one of the chickens is in the brood mood staying on the eggs all day long. So I was thinking since they had a rooster, which must have been fertilizing those eggs should I just leave the brooding hen on the eggs? 

post #2 of 7
Yes many have broody hens that hatch and raise chicks. I had my first one last summer and it was a joy to watch her raise them. If you want to add to your flock let her hatch and raise them.

Here is an article on broody hens ~ http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/guide-to-letting-broody-hens-hatch-and-raise-chicks

Good luck.
post #3 of 7

Here's another resource....lots of info and good place to ask questions:

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/496101/broody-hen-thread

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #4 of 7
I just hatched 2 new birds out over 3 weeks ago from a broody hen be sure and remove her to a different place with water and food otherwise you will have issues as I did. Also I have my doubts that the egg is fertile as its been over a week of laying eggs and no roo to fertilize... Just keep in mind that the broody hen will stop laying eggs and will sit for about a month and after all that If the egg turns out not fertilized then the broody hen will not start laying eggs again for about a week or so after she stops sitting... Just want to make sure you are prepared for all of this to happen without gaining anything from it.
Now if you brought the roo back for about a week or so again to fertilize a small clutch for the hen to hatch then send him away again then it may be worth the trouble.
Good luck and if you did try to have her hatch some it is the coolest thing to watch and experience I promote it 100%!
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukedawg View Post

... Also I have my doubts that the egg is fertile as its been over a week of laying eggs and no roo to fertilize... ..

Fertility can last up to about 4 weeks......1 week should be fine.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thank you guys for your replies. Made it much more clear for me.
post #7 of 7
Read that article especially. There are different ways to do any of this but that covers most of the important points.

Most hens stay fertile for two weeks after a mating pretty regularly. Some can stay fertile longer than that but fertility starts dropping off after two weeks. I suggest you collect eggs to hatch until that two weeks are up them start them all at the same time.

You want to start all the eggs at the same time, otherwise you get a staggered hatch. The eggs that start later don’t have time to develop so they die.

If you want her to hatch with the flock mark all the eggs you want her to hatch, I use a Sharpie, then check with her every day to remove any eggs that don’t belong. As long as you remove them every day you can still use them. There will not be any surprises in them when you open them. If you decide to isolate her from the flock that potential problem goes away but she might break from being broody when you move her. As the article said, there are pros and cons both ways.

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying › Natural way of egg hatching