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How big of an area to keep chicks until they fly the coop!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
We built this and our 25 chicks come tomorrow morning and I'm wondering if this will work out for them. Anyone have suggestions?
post #2 of 7

How big is it?  What are you putting on it for sides?  Where are you going to put it?  

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post

How big is it?  What are you putting on it for sides?  Where are you going to put it?  
5x3 and sides are 8 " high. We have it set up in our basement.
post #4 of 7

you need much higher sides. Then as they get older, you'll want to fashion a top for it. Then 25 birds will outgrow that after a few weeks.

post #5 of 7

I would have sides about 24", and I'd have a top for it right away.  IF you wait to put a top on, you may have them escaping before you "get around to it".  And if a baby chick gets out of the brooder, it may die of hypothermia before you discover it.  That size will last them for a few weeks, but don't expect it to last until they are ready for the coop!  They grow amazingly fast, and by 2 weeks they are able to fly incredibly well, and will want to be able to get lots of exercise.  

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #6 of 7

Someone on this forum lost a chick out of a cover-less brooder. They thought the dog might have eaten it. We urged them not to give up looking for the chick, like Lazy pointed out, since it was in danger of getting too cold. They found it several hours later in the boy's bedroom closet in the laundry basket where the little fugitive had hunkered down in the dirty clothes to stay warm.

 

Chicks double in size each week, so by the end of two weeks, your 25 chicks will be six times larger than when you got them as day-olds.

 

Your best option would be to plan on finishing brooding them in your coop, or just brood them in the coop from the start. Many of us brood outdoors, and it's really no different than brooding indoors except all the mess is outside where it belongs, and the chicks have plenty of room to develop.

 

I recently wrote an article, linked below under "Articles", that enumerates all the advantages to brooding outdoors. It will surprise you to know chicks do quite well under very cold temps, and as long as they have an adequate heat source, their environment can be below freezing with the chicks suffering no ill effects. In fact, the cold will stimulate feather growth, and the chicks will be weaned off heat much sooner.

 

Even if you already have adult chickens in the coop, there's no reason why the chicks can't grow and develop right along side the rest of the flock.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thank you for the input everyone, it's greatly appreciated!
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