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cooked bones not good for dogs -- how 'bout chickens? - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

I'm reluctant to kill Ivan due to his breed, Barred Rock, considered to make good pets. Yeah, I was surprised given he's never let me pet him. Then a chicken-loving neighbour told me that because Ivan is 2nd fiddle to Alfie, our true alpha rooster, he's just frustrated at not having his own flock. Almost every time Ivan attacks me Alfie maneuvers to protect me. Yet Alfie has almost never let me pet him, maybe twice, all tolled. That chicken-lover friend says she cuddles her girls. Mine wont let me catch them, let alone cuddle. All makes me too unsure Ivan is the problem, or has inherent badboy traits for passing on. Shrug,  PeaceNick

post #12 of 15

9 time out of 10 the aggression a rooster has to the handler/owner is do to them being improperly raised.

Over handling and thinking there a lap pet will cause some chickens to become defensive and they will tend to attack. Your rooster could also be defending his flock, he could be the dominate rooster of the flock. Roosters will also protect a clutch of eggs just prior to a hen going broody.

 

The other rooster you talked about most likely isn't "defending" you, he is just doing what is natural to him and that's just trying to show dominance over another rooster (the attacking rooster).

 

Also for all that said to put the rooster down, would you put a hen down for protecting her chicks?

If not then why put if down a rooster for protecting his flock or human error?

 

 

I'm all for culling out animals for food, or do to illness but I don't know the whole story on how the animal was raised or being raised so I can not say to cull it... I would suggest that you feed in a feeder and not throw there feed on the ground, you could be spooking the chickens and that can bring on aggression also to cut back on the petting. Try letting them be chicken for a wile and see what happens.

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

Yeah, well this is the first time I ever had chickens. I've tried to do what's best for them...what resonates with me as best for them. Been on here a while to learn how to. I dont treat the birds as pets or anything but birds. Till we restarted this nearby garden I've encouraged their flying and the 3rd batch of chickens we received can fly and do. That's why we canopied over their run. I dont want them eating our vulnerable garden starts.

 

Seems you're right about Alfie not defending me as much as reasserting his dominance. I expressed no intention to put down the offending rooster. Believe me I rarely have tried to pet them. My hand-feeding them by scattering feed all over the run just makes too much sense to me and feeders (a trough) rings truly unnatural. I will continue letting chickens be chickens. Cluck Cluck, Nick

post #14 of 15
Quote:

Originally Posted by amiachicknorwat View Post

 

 My hand-feeding them by scattering feed all over the run just makes too much sense to me and feeders (a trough) rings truly unnatural. I will continue letting chickens be chickens. Cluck Cluck, Nick

 

Honestly, since there were never any wild chickens there is no true "natural" way of feeding a chicken.

Chickens are a subspecies that humans created by the selective breeding of Gallus (Junglefowl).

 

Since chickens have been bred and cared for by man for hundreds of years the more correct way of feeding them would be to feed them in a feeder. Feeding a mash, crumble or pelleted feed on the ground can cause health problems if the feed becomes moldy.


Edited by Circle-M-Farm - 4/25/16 at 5:17am
post #15 of 15

Cull any dominant cockerel/ cock bird. There is no reason for human aggression. If bred properly chickens are very well mannered and will not flog people. Birds from hatcheries have a much higher rate of aggression than birds from breeders. If aggression is not tolerated then it rarely shows up in a flock- vastly a inherited trait. Once you get birds with excellent temperment you'll wonder why you dealt with jerks for so long. No need for it. Sure there are methods of managing that will reduce aggression but honestly take it from a person who did all that, it's not calming to worry about the kids and how they behave around the birds. It not fun to keep in mind never to turn your back on the cock bird. Once you get a good cockerel you'll be quick to cull any sign of a bad one in the future. My 3 year old is a terror for animals. He's done things I want to flog him over yet my males have never chased, puffed or stood upright to him let alone actually flog. Not that I'd let the boy alone with the birds but it's still peace of mind as he's running about while I'm tending to the coop. Plenty of good birds out there even from hatchery stock. If you want excellent temperment get standard bred from breeders. If a real breeder and person who shows there will be no human aggression at all no matter how you raise them. It was bred out long ago. Humans have been breeding chickens for thousands of years. Intensely over the past two centuries. You get birds from a breeder who's been showing and breeding for decades and you'll have the least non human aggressive birds. Even docile Silikie from hatchery stock have been known to be aggressive. It's allowed. 

 

Forgot about the original post- I put all bones out for the birds to pick clean. Not chicken bones I've made broth with but chicken roasted and ham and any bone with gristle, marrow, small bits of meat. If my run wasn't portable it would be a bone yard. I'd never thought about bones from broth being soft or dangerous just didn't feed them as all the nutrients are simmered out of them already. 


Edited by Egghead_Jr - 4/25/16 at 5:54am

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-Charles Dudley Warner

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