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Blueberry Bush with Yellowish Leaves?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have 8 Rabbit Eye Bushes planted last year - all cultivars had similar colored leaves.  

 

But this year my Tif Blue plant has leaves that are much lighter than the other plants - a yellow green - no difference in the veins on the leaves - just different than the other types. 

The plant looks healthy but very little flowering/fruiting on it.

 

I tested the ph of the soil and it in range,  gave the plant an iron boost a couple of weeks ago and no change in the leaves.  

 

Any ideas?

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post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflour View Post
 

I have 8 Rabbit Eye Bushes planted last year - all cultivars had similar colored leaves.  

 

But this year my Tif Blue plant has leaves that are much lighter than the other plants - a yellow green - no difference in the veins on the leaves - just different than the other types. 

The plant looks healthy but very little flowering/fruiting on it.

 

I tested the ph of the soil and it in range,  gave the plant an iron boost a couple of weeks ago and no change in the leaves.  

 

Any ideas?

 

Are you sure it's not just the new leaves that are lighter?  Mine do that every year and I have blueberries growing wild under every tree, bush, next to the house, they're like a weed here.  The leaves darken as the year progresses.  Ammonium sulfate and magnesium sulfate (epsom salts) are good for blueberries.  The light leaves could be sulfur.

 

post #3 of 7

I do not know about the needs of your southern soil, or your rabbit-eyes, compared to our northern soil and berries.  But, I can tell you that my berries benefit greatly from addition of epsom salt.  My berries also benefit from Miracid for fertilizer or a similar product due to their acid loving nature.  I also use pine needle mulch when ever I can get hold of it.

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Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

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Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SittinDuck View Post
 

 

Are you sure it's not just the new leaves that are lighter?  Mine do that every year and I have blueberries growing wild under every tree, bush, next to the house, they're like a weed here.  The leaves darken as the year progresses.  Ammonium sulfate and magnesium sulfate (epsom salts) are good for blueberries.  The light leaves could be sulfur.

 


It is the entire plant.  The other cultivars had yellower new leaves and are now greener.

I did check the pH around the plant in question and it is in range.

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Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

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Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 

I do not know about the needs of your southern soil, or your rabbit-eyes, compared to our northern soil and berries.  But, I can tell you that my berries benefit greatly from addition of epsom salt.  My berries also benefit from Miracid for fertilizer or a similar product due to their acid loving nature.  I also use pine needle mulch when ever I can get hold of it.


What does the Epsom Salt do?  I do have some I can try.

 

I used acid lovers fertilizer - the soil in my berry patch is not GA soil - it was a bought topsoil years ago.  Will check out the Miracid fertilizer?

 

Unlike most folks around here, I don't have Pine Trees - only deciduous hardwood trees. ;)  And buying pine needles here can bring in ticks and occasional snake :sick 

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Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

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Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

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post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflour View Post
 


What does the Epsom Salt do?  I do have some I can try.

 

I used acid lovers fertilizer - the soil in my berry patch is not GA soil - it was a bought topsoil years ago.  Will check out the Miracid fertilizer?

 

Unlike most folks around here, I don't have Pine Trees - only deciduous hardwood trees. ;)  And buying pine needles here can bring in ticks and occasional snake :sick 

 

Maybe you hit a pocket of something weird in that particular patch of soil that you planted that bush.

 

Epsom salts has magnesium and that is essential to chlorophyll

 

 

Epsom salt has a lot of water in it, so it will take a good amount to do anything.

 

(MgSO4·7H2O)

 

Miracid is good stuff.

 

Blueberries are understory bushes, meaning they grow under the canopy of other trees.  They grow in deep litter of leaves and organics, which are very acid.  Hardwood leaves are what the blueberry evolved with and are perfect.  Pine needles, wood chips, bark, whatever.  It's all organic and blueberries love it.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SittinDuck View Post
 

 

Maybe you hit a pocket of something weird in that particular patch of soil that you planted that bush.

 

I think this is the answer and what i have been thinking.  It is likely this one gets a little less sun than the others and is down slope from the rest.

 

Since the plant looks healthy, will just keep a close eye on it for now.

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Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

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Attention:  loads of contests to enter, pick your favorites and join the fun: post #1

 

 

Raising Hens in Georgia!  Limited experience, but a lot of opinions.  

Reintegrating a Recovered Hen to a Small Flock:

Don't be Chicken, Even a Cat Can Bake a Gingerbread House

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