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replacing baby chick - will other chicks accept the new one? - Page 4

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Oh Geez, Bummer!...but not surprising. I'm so sorry you're having such rotten first time luck, hard way to start out.

I conclude that those chicks had something wrong with them from the get go, disease or internal deformity.

Any way to quietly review that hatchery's reputation? I would not buy from them again, that's for sure.

Sad the last chick will likely succumb, but makes moving forward simpler in a way.

Sanitize the cage and all equipment with a strong bleach solution, let all air dry in the sun for a week, and start over with chicks from another source.


    What a heart breaking experiencing for you.  I agree with aart.  Clean up and then get your babies from a different place and start over.  It doesn't sound like you did anything wrong.  Sure, one or two can die, but when it is that many, there is a problem.  In addition to other things, it would bother me that he isn't on site to catch a potential problem as it starts.

post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much Aart, Dekel, CT and Jaded Phoenix for all your help, advice and kind words.

 

The last baby chick died this evening at 8.30pm while I was holding her. You can imagine how heartbreaking this experience has been.

 

I've already taken out all the litter and put it on the compost, and I've washed down the plastic tote box, the dog crate and all the accessories with a strong bleach solution.

 

I have seen an ad for a different supplier who is quite local to me. We will go there next weekend and pick out 4 healthy strong looking birds. And if I see any dead chicks anywhere I will walk out and find a different supplier.

 

This experience has not dampened my dream to have chickens living with me in my garden and vegetable patch.

 

Thank you again for all your help.

Mother of 3 boys and 1 girl, Grandmother of a beautiful bouncing baby girl, sharing my life with 1 rescued Spanish greyhound, 3 rescued cats, 1 cochin pullet, 2 black australorp hens, 1 buff orpington pullet and 1 buff orpington rooster
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Mother of 3 boys and 1 girl, Grandmother of a beautiful bouncing baby girl, sharing my life with 1 rescued Spanish greyhound, 3 rescued cats, 1 cochin pullet, 2 black australorp hens, 1 buff orpington pullet and 1 buff orpington rooster
Reply
post #33 of 38

Hope you get your healthy chicks next time.  Having to watch any animal suffer and die is never easy. 

post #34 of 38

I'm so glad to hear you're ready to forge ahead despite the heartbreak...kudos to you!

 

Keep thinking.... how did they get lice if living only with other incubated chicks.

Usually they only live on the birds and are spread by close physical contact.

 

Anyway, hope the next chapter is filled with healthy chicks and happy keepers!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

I'm so glad to hear you're ready to forge ahead despite the heartbreak...kudos to you!

 

Keep thinking.... how did they get lice if living only with other incubated chicks.

Usually they only live on the birds and are spread by close physical contact.

 

Anyway, hope the next chapter is filled with healthy chicks and happy keepers!

If the breeder had them on his outside chickens they could transfer to him and then to the chicks.  Especially if the individual isn't careful about bio-security; which I doubt this guy was.

How can I think outside of the box when they won't let me out?

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How can I think outside of the box when they won't let me out?

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post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

 

Keep thinking.... how did they get lice if living only with other incubated chicks.

Usually they only live on the birds and are spread by close physical contact.

 

 

you have a point there - weird... Jaded Phoenix is probably right with the theory

Quote:
Originally Posted by JadedPhoenix View Post
 

If the breeder had them on his outside chickens they could transfer to him and then to the chicks.  Especially if the individual isn't careful about bio-security; which I doubt this guy was.


Edited by elaineinspain - 4/30/16 at 1:39pm
Mother of 3 boys and 1 girl, Grandmother of a beautiful bouncing baby girl, sharing my life with 1 rescued Spanish greyhound, 3 rescued cats, 1 cochin pullet, 2 black australorp hens, 1 buff orpington pullet and 1 buff orpington rooster
Reply
Mother of 3 boys and 1 girl, Grandmother of a beautiful bouncing baby girl, sharing my life with 1 rescued Spanish greyhound, 3 rescued cats, 1 cochin pullet, 2 black australorp hens, 1 buff orpington pullet and 1 buff orpington rooster
Reply
post #37 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JadedPhoenix View Post
 

If the breeder had them on his outside chickens they could transfer to him and then to the chicks.  Especially if the individual isn't careful about bio-security; which I doubt this guy was.


he walked from the big birds runs to the brooders with the eggs, and handled the chicks immediately after being in the runs without washing his hands or wearing any special clothes for being with the babies.

I never knew before how easy it is to transmit lice/ disease around.

 

Thanks for the tip -I have something to watch out for at the next suppliers.....

Mother of 3 boys and 1 girl, Grandmother of a beautiful bouncing baby girl, sharing my life with 1 rescued Spanish greyhound, 3 rescued cats, 1 cochin pullet, 2 black australorp hens, 1 buff orpington pullet and 1 buff orpington rooster
Reply
Mother of 3 boys and 1 girl, Grandmother of a beautiful bouncing baby girl, sharing my life with 1 rescued Spanish greyhound, 3 rescued cats, 1 cochin pullet, 2 black australorp hens, 1 buff orpington pullet and 1 buff orpington rooster
Reply
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by elaineinspain View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JadedPhoenix View Post
 

If the breeder had them on his outside chickens they could transfer to him and then to the chicks.  Especially if the individual isn't careful about bio-security; which I doubt this guy was.


he walked from the big birds runs to the brooders with the eggs, and handled the chicks immediately after being in the runs without washing his hands or wearing any special clothes for being with the babies.

I never knew before how easy it is to transmit lice/ disease around.

 

Thanks for the tip -I have something to watch out for at the next suppliers.....

Yep, when I have separate ages I always go from the youngest to the oldest.  The older chickens are far more likely to be immuned to be anything that the chicks have but not the other way around.  

How can I think outside of the box when they won't let me out?

Reply

How can I think outside of the box when they won't let me out?

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