BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Quail › Questions about keeping Quail
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Questions about keeping Quail - Page 2

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lsky View Post
They'll be outside in the day, but locked in the coop at night.

 

You may have a hard time getting them into the coop each night.  They are not like chickens....you are going to have to chase them around to get them to go in.  Most likely will need to literally pick each one up and place it in the coop, while somehow keeping the ones inside....inside...while you chase down the others.  Most people with larger runs/aviaries do not have an official coop.  Some do (and they look great), but it seems the majority don't.  I personally just have a dog house that they sometimes go into, sometimes don't.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paneubert View Post

You may have a hard time getting them into the coop each night.  They are not like chickens....you are going to have to chase them around to get them to go in.  Most likely will need to literally pick each one up and place it in the coop, while somehow keeping the ones inside....inside...while you chase down the others.  Most people with larger runs/aviaries do not have an official coop.  Some do (and they look great), but it seems the majority don't.  I personally just have a dog house that they sometimes go into, sometimes don't.
I would just put in a shelter but it gets cold and windy/wet so I'm worried they'll die if the door's open at all times. I don't mind lifting them in individually, perhaps I could fit a trap door in the roof to plop them into so they wouldn't run out again. Then use the front door to let them out.
post #13 of 14

If you are doing any version of Coturnix japonica (often called Japanese Quail, Coturnix, Texas A&M, English white, golden, red, Italian, Manchurian, Tibetan, rosetta, scarlett, roux dilute, golden tuxedo, many other names....), keep in mind they originally came from East Asia and Russia.  They can handle sub-zero temperatures easily.  They just need a place to get out of the wind and rain.  They don't need actual "heat" for the winter since they huddle together for warmth (think penguins in Antarctica), and they grow a nice downy layer of feathers for the winter.  Yeah, you don't want to toss 3 week old chicks outside in January, but if your birds are full grown and have been out since summer/Autumn, they will be fine in Winter. 

 

More power to ya if you want to make a coop and stick them in it each night.  Nothing wrong with that.  Just want you to know that you don't "have" to.

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paneubert View Post

If you are doing any version of Coturnix japonica (often called Japanese Quail, Coturnix, Texas A&M, English white, golden, red, Italian, Manchurian, Tibetan, rosetta, scarlett, roux dilute, golden tuxedo, many other names....), keep in mind they originally came from East Asia and Russia.  They can handle sub-zero temperatures easily.  They just need a place to get out of the wind and rain.  They don't need actual "heat" for the winter since they huddle together for warmth (think penguins in Antarctica), and they grow a nice downy layer of feathers for the winter.  Yeah, you don't want to toss 3 week old chicks outside in January, but if your birds are full grown and have been out since summer/Autumn, they will be fine in Winter. 

More power to ya if you want to make a coop and stick them in it each night.  Nothing wrong with that.  Just want you to know that you don't "have" to.
Ah, that's interesting. Very useful information. Thanks smile.png
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Quail
BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Other BackYard Poultry › Quail › Questions about keeping Quail