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runny noses??

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
we've got a flock of 19, which includes 2 roosters who we've had for almost 1 week. tonight when i went in the coop to count them one hen sneezed. the coop is dusty and such so i ignored it but in the next minute she sneezed 2 or 3 more times so i shone a flashlight in her face and saw her nose was snotty and she was sniffling a bit. i took her out and caged her to get her away from the rest, then went in to double check and make sure the rest were fine. i found one who looked like it was slightly runny, but there was also hay on it. i took her out and when i pulled the hay off it came with sticky snot, so i put her with the other one. when i first saw the first one, i thought i saw thick and greenish yellow mucus, but looking a second time i think i was mistaken, because it is clear. what do i do?? they don't seem to have any other symptoms, but i only just noticed the issue. the new roosters seem completely fine, but could they have brought this in?? i'll try to attach some pictures.
post #2 of 4
Thread Starter 

they're still very alert and lively, second one bit me when i went to take her out of the coop and the first one put up a fight about going back in the cage after i took the picture. they're eating just fine. 

post #3 of 4
Where did the roosters come from? Did you quarantine them before placing them with your flock? Quarantine is a very important procedure. There are many diseases, namely a few viruses and respiratory diseases, which can infect a bird and asymptomatically inhabit it for it's entire lifetime. These birds may never appear sick or have recovered long ago, but are still infectious and will spread the disease easily.

I don't mean to scare you but recently introduced new birds + sudden symptoms in multiple birds is almost always the result of an infectious disease.

It's important to know that chickens do not get colds; occasionally, extreme stress or a dust allergy may cause one individual to begin having a slight cough or sniffle, but this is very rare and it would take a lot of stress or dust to cause it. Multiple birds having symptoms at the same time is pretty much not something that should ever occur due to environmental issues.

I would suggest segregating all sniffling birds and the new roosters from the flock immediately and disinfecting everything. I'd recommend observing them for a few days and if symptoms continue that long, you should have them blood tested by a vet. The most common infectious respiratory disease is Mycoplasma, of which there are two forms; the Synoviae species and the Gallisepticum species. On average a blood test and vet visit will run $30-$60. Now I'm usually one for at home fixes, but if there is any chance your birds have an infectious respiratory disease, it's time to go to the vet. Many respiratory diseases will have identical symptoms but require different treatments; hence the necessity for a blood test to confirm which disease you may be dealing with.

In the mean time, don't touch the sickly birds or roosters and the rest of your flock without washing your hands and changing your clothes in between, and watch all of your as so far healthy birds very carefully for any kind of symptoms at all. Don't medicate anything; it's important at this stage to watch how symptoms develop, not to try to mask them. Don't sell or rehome any of your birds, and if you have any chicken-keeping friends over, don't let them walk in your coop or run.

200 something birds. 8 species. ♥ Norman ♥ Norma ♥ Misha ♥ and ♥ Taylor ♥ are my babies.
Visit Norman the Rooster's Thread Here!
Breeding Sex Linked Silkies, Gamefowl, and EEs/OEs. Amateur genetics buff. Caponization practitioner/advocate.
Working at The Poultry Palace in Placerville, CA. Come see us for started pullets, chicks, Bar Ale feed, & more!

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200 something birds. 8 species. ♥ Norman ♥ Norma ♥ Misha ♥ and ♥ Taylor ♥ are my babies.
Visit Norman the Rooster's Thread Here!
Breeding Sex Linked Silkies, Gamefowl, and EEs/OEs. Amateur genetics buff. Caponization practitioner/advocate.
Working at The Poultry Palace in Placerville, CA. Come see us for started pullets, chicks, Bar Ale feed, & more!

Reply
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 

the roos just came from a poultry swap at tractor supply, and no unfortunately we didn't quarantine them. thank you very much for your response i'll definitely do this!!

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