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Is a Milk Crate Big Enough to Plant a Tomato?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hey all, just looking for some advice. I'm going to have my big garden out back, but I'm wanting a little group of planters with some tomatoes up close to the house. I'm looking around at what I have to use for planters, and a milk crate caught my eye. I could line it with say paper bags? to help hold the dirt in. Just wonder if you all think it would be large enough. I've got grape and cherry tomatoes and Early Girls. 

 

If not tomatoes, I could stuff it with Wave petunias, I guess. That could be pretty too :)

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #2 of 8

A lot of people grow tomatoes in 5 gallon buckets - which is probably pretty close in size to the crate.  It will probably be fine...

On vaccinating v/s Marek's Disease - ( here & here )
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On vaccinating v/s Marek's Disease - ( here & here )
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Probably pretty close, you're right. I went ahead and planted one, I think the Early Girl. We'll see how it does. Thanks!

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #4 of 8

Small varieties grow well in 5-gallon buckets, but the big indeterminate vines would prefer something with more room, like an 18-gallon container. I put two plants in 27-gallon containers. They will grow in small containers, but the plants won't be as big and robust and you won't get nearly the yield from them.

Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

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Allyn at Hinton Homestead on the sunny Mississippi Gulf Coast

36 Delawares

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post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post
 

Probably pretty close, you're right. I went ahead and planted one, I think the Early Girl. We'll see how it does. Thanks!

From all my reading at a tomato forum, you just need to feed that plant  in a bucket what it needs to keep producing. Water, supplements, compost tea, etc. Dont worrry about rootbound..Just keep feeding it.  With the early girl as an indeterminate, you can prune it to just a few leaders......it is a vine type and should produce all the way to frost...just needs to be kept growing so it can set new buds for more fruit. Think a good support for it, too.Many options there. A cage, a stake, or overhead structure..... or you might try Mr Wilbers method, or a shorter version of it.

 

Ive been spending farrrrr too much time at Tomato ville!!!!! :gig 

 

 

Grow where you are planted. --Unknown

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Grow where you are planted. --Unknown

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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Well, it did fine. Not a huge, highly productive plant like were it planted in the ground, but good enough. I had to water basically every day, and did compost tea a lot. I'll probably use the crate for cherry tomatoes this coming year. 

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by donrae View Post
 

Well, it did fine. Not a huge, highly productive plant like were it planted in the ground, but good enough. I had to water basically every day, and did compost tea a lot. I'll probably use the crate for cherry tomatoes this coming year. 

Hmmmm a cherry is usually very vigorous.  Have you thought about one of the newish dwarf intdeterminates??? A group is developing tomatos that are crosses using a dwarf and a favorite indeterminate. If NOT suckered it will stay a bushy determinate like tomato vine. 

I have been eager to try a couple , they have over 60 varieties now released thru small growers. Some willl produce up to 10 pounds of fruit in a season, others are less productive.

 

THe 10 pound list and taste by one consumer at 8/10 for flavor. 

Dwarf Emerald Giant,

Summertime Green,

 Rosella Purple,

 Mr. Snow,

 Wild Fred,

 Sweet Sue

, Summer Sunrise,

 Summertime Gold,

Summer Sweet Gold,

Wherokowhai,

 Blazing Beauty,

 Orange Cream,

 Golden Gypsy,

 TastyWine,

Wild Spudleaf

 Loxton Lad (or Lass).

 

Tomato season will soon be here...again!

 

 

Grow where you are planted. --Unknown

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Grow where you are planted. --Unknown

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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Honestly, I've not even thought about a garden for the coming year. We've been back and forth on moving or not, so I've not wanted to make plans for the place we live currently. But I"m thinking containers will be the way to go, they can up and move with me if that happens. I'll refer to your list, thanks so much for that. Tomatoes are hand's down my favorite thing :love

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

Reply
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