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Breed or genetics sickness or disease?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I have alot of chickens and ducks and geese and turkeys 80+ birds But I also do meat rotations. I have never had this problem before or anything but I got 33 Cornish X and 3 Buff orpingtons and 3 Pekin ducks in my order this month they were all fine until about week 2 they started sneezing but it was only the cornish birds. Everyone else was fine after being together for 2 weeks with the sneezing but i finally separated the ducks and chick's from the cornish just to be safe but there just fine nor sneezing or anything like I said just the cornish ones and all my other birds are perfectly fine its just this weird batch of cornish there not puffy eyed there not lethargic or runny nose or anything they been like this for 4 weeks now and are just fine eating and running around and everything I even changed pine shavings to hay for bedding even gave them some electrolytes packs. Even bleached and did a deep clean of the brooder for a possible mold and layed down DE in case mites were gettin in there nostrils I have Litterally searched and looked and did everything. There not in any pain there happy and what not and I haven't lost any of em. So I just wonder if this could be because of genetics or something they got from the mother I'm just out of options now and just curious of what could be going on.
post #2 of 6

It's hard to say whether it is an environmental problem (from dust in feed or bedding, mold, or poor air circulation) or an infectious problem such as a virus or bacterial disease without testing or having a necropsy done. Fortunately, it seems to only affect your meat birds, which I assume you are going to butcher soon. Infectious bronchitis can be very common with sneezing the usual symptom, but with mycoplasma (MG) there can be mild strains or severe ones, and it can pass through some of the hatching eggs. 

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
That's pretty much all I could think of also. BUT the real question is will they survive 4 more weeks and be fine until culling time.
post #4 of 6
I am not an expert on meat birds, but many butcher around 6 weeks of age. You could always give them some Tylan soluble powder in their water, which is an antibiotic used for respiratory diseases, with a one day withdrawal time for meat. Oxytetracycline is cheaper, but has a 3 week withdrawal. Tylan powder is $55 or more. Since it could be a virus that won't respond to antibiotics, I would probably just watch them.
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
You can at 6, 8, or 12 for others such as red rangers depends on the bird really but if you wait the extra 2 weeks it's always paid off its seems so I do 8 weeks. I'm trying to go more no antibiotics or anything. I don't even do electrolytes unless it's necessary like in this case where I though I was going to lose 30 birds at once but they have gone almost 5 weeks now and have been fine. So idk what's going on with them.
post #6 of 6
I don't blame you about the antibiotics in meat you are going to eat. Electrolytes don't bother me though since they are in food and a natural part of the blood. Gatorade and baby fluid, Pedialyte are just pure electrolytes.
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