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Cecal or coccidiosis suspicion?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
this is the poo in question. I found a few in the coop today and freaked out. I have only had this flock a week so I am airing on the side of caution. Started treated with Corid but wondering if I overreacted
post #2 of 5

It's hard to tell. Not all Coccidiosis type poop has blood in it or looks funky. It is easier to diagnose the bird instead of the poop sometimes. Birds with Cocci will become lethargic, stand in the corner all fluffed up, won't eat or drink, lose lots of weight and eventually die.

 

Poop comes in all shapes, sizes, colors, consistencies, etc... As long as funky looking poop is not a regular occurrence, generally there is nothing to worry about. 

 

All this being said, Corid won't hurt them if you started them on it. It is a thiamine blocker and will inhibit the reproduction of the Cocci. If your birds are on medicated feed, you must remove the medicated and get regular feed when using Corid or you can over medicate. 

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

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Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCrows View Post

It's hard to tell. Not all Coccidiosis type poop has blood in it or looks funky. It is easier to diagnose the bird instead of the poop sometimes. Birds with Cocci will become lethargic, stand in the corner all fluffed up, won't eat or drink, lose lots of weight and eventually die.

Poop comes in all shapes, sizes, colors, consistencies, etc... As long as funky looking poop is not a regular occurrence, generally there is nothing to worry about. 

All this being said, Corid won't hurt them if you started them on it. It is a thiamine blocker and will inhibit the reproduction of the Cocci. If your birds are on medicated feed, you must remove the medicated and get regular feed when using Corid or you can over medicate. 

They are on regular pellets now. Not medicated so we are ok there. They are acting fine otherwise. Very active. I just worry because this flock is so new to me. I don't know their history at all. I'm also not sure if they've ever been dewormed at all. Any advice to start them on a deworming schedule?
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0rthernChicks View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCrows View Post

It's hard to tell. Not all Coccidiosis type poop has blood in it or looks funky. It is easier to diagnose the bird instead of the poop sometimes. Birds with Cocci will become lethargic, stand in the corner all fluffed up, won't eat or drink, lose lots of weight and eventually die.

Poop comes in all shapes, sizes, colors, consistencies, etc... As long as funky looking poop is not a regular occurrence, generally there is nothing to worry about. 

All this being said, Corid won't hurt them if you started them on it. It is a thiamine blocker and will inhibit the reproduction of the Cocci. If your birds are on medicated feed, you must remove the medicated and get regular feed when using Corid or you can over medicate. 

They are on regular pellets now. Not medicated so we are ok there. They are acting fine otherwise. Very active. I just worry because this flock is so new to me. I don't know their history at all. I'm also not sure if they've ever been dewormed at all. Any advice to start them on a deworming schedule?

If you purchased these birds as grown birds, you can never be too sure if they have worms or not. You can take a poop sample into your vet for tests, any vet can do this and usually it is fairly inexpensive.

 

Most healthy birds learn how to control worms in the intestines for the most part and some flocks never need worming. Birds that are free ranged a lot can and do pick up worms especially in wet climates. 

 

If you want to just go ahead and worm them anyway just in case, I recommend Safeguard Liquid Goat Wormer. You can get this at any Tractor Supply in the horse section in the back. You will need an empty 3ml syringe as well, no needle. You will give this orally for 3 days in a row. 1/2 ml for full sized birds, 1/4 ml for bantams. Once a day for 3 days. Then about 10 days later, repeat this dosage. Egg withdrawal is 2 weeks from the last dosage. Most birds are good with a once a year worming. It all depends on your climate, your free ranging schedule and your birds. You could always take a sample in while you worm them this first time. Then you will know what you are dealing with if anything. Round worms are in every soil all across the globe. Very few birds DON'T have worms. Whether or not they are overloaded...tests can tell this. I worm my birds twice a year regardless. Worms will kill poultry. 

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
post #5 of 5

After the worming, I do recommend probiotics to replace any good bacteria killed off during worming. 

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply

Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul. ~Emily Dickinson~

 

You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.  ~John Bunyan~

 

Treating Sour Crop and Impacted Crop                                    Raising Quail

 

How to Treat Egg Binding in Hens 

 

Leg, Foot and Toe Issues in Poultry of All Ages

Reply
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