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Selling and going big -- 100+ chicken ideas - Page 5

post #41 of 71
Thread Starter 

Got the double 2x6's done.  Worked out great.  Only one post was a little short (1").  Also started putting up the rafters.  Looked at the price of tin at home depot and almost had a heart attack.  $22 for a 10'x2' piece.  We'll need around 42 pieces...  Yikes!

 

So, I started out building the double 2x6 on the ground.  Went to lift it a realized that was a big mistake.  No biggie though.  I split it in half and put them up with my wife's strong back helping (gotta love German women).

 

Beam, before we split it.

 

 

 

Still not sure what to do on the front.  Would like to make a little covered porch, but there are large doors on the barn that open outward.  The recently framed in part will be the main entrance to the run.  Used hurricane straps/ties to attach the rafter.  Going to do rafters every 24". 

 

Let me know if you see anything where we could improve.

post #42 of 71
Thread Starter 

Rained today, but we still wanted to make some progress.  Got the rafters up and most of the hurricane straps screwed on.  The barn oak is so hard that we had trouble getting screws in.  Broke around 20 structural screws! 

 

Wife working under the dripping tin!

 

 

24"s on center

 

 

Two Brinsea Eco 50s to go with our Eco 20.

 

post #43 of 71

Had same trouble with my old shed, had to drill pilot holes for even deck screws.

 

Having heat plate envy...did you look at DIY with heating pads, or Sweeter Heaters for more capacity??

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #44 of 71
Thread Starter 

Thanks aart.  Going to go back with the drill and make some pilot holes for the ones we couldn't get in.  Thought about the DIY heating pads, but we're short on time.  They'll be in the basement for at least 4 weeks, so this should hold them.  Wish we could have them out in the coop...

post #45 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alabama Jack View Post
 

Thanks aart.  Going to go back with the drill and make some pilot holes for the ones we couldn't get in.  Thought about the DIY heating pads, but we're short on time.  They'll be in the basement for at least 4 weeks, so this should hold them.  Wish we could have them out in the coop...

Beeswax or soap can help drive screws into that old wood, even with pilot holes.

 

You got power out there?

Oh, coop areas probably aren't built in barn yet.


Edited by aart - 3/13/17 at 4:40pm

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #46 of 71

You  might check to see if you have a metal supply company around that sell and build metal pole barns. I found in my area that all the smaller electrical, plumbing and metal suppliers were way cheaper than lowes,home depot, menards and suttherlands.

 

Scott

post #47 of 71
Thread Starter 
Thanks Scott, we found some cheaper tin at a metal building place! Half the price of Home Depot...

Wife and I made a brooder today. Started with 1x8" 10' rough cut white oak boards (cheaper than Home Depot, and weather resistant ($5.40 per board.)). We ripped them in half for the structure, and again for the top. We will convert it to a meat chicken tractor, when the chicks move to the coop.







post #48 of 71

Sweet!

You can send that junior chicken juggler in to grab birds under the part that doesn't open!

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #49 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Sweet!

You can send that junior chicken juggler in to grab birds under the part that doesn't open!


LOL!  It will be a pain to get them out.

post #50 of 71
Thread Starter 

Got a bit more done, and ordered the metal roof, which will be ready tomorrow.  $1.45 a foot for 3 foot wide GalvAlum panels.

 

Put in boards between the rafters, so there are no gaps.  Also got all the Hurricane ties done.

 

 

 

I'm not going to match the existing tin, as we want to eventually replace it, sot he metal supply store suggested a transition type thingy.  We'll see tomorrow...

 

 

Also cut all the rafter ends for a vertical surface.  We'll put on 1x4's to attach gutters to.

 

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