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Planting where there used to be a run.

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I recently moved my chicken coop and run. It had been in the previous location for a little over a year. Is there any way to speed up the breakdown of ammonia in the soil to enable me to plant a few heavy feeding plants there this season? Anything I can do to neutralize the smell?

Thanks

post #2 of 5

IMO, the biggest problems with growing where there were chickens is the soil compaction and excess phosphorus. That inhibits uptake of zinc and iron, causing a deficiency of those minerals.

I don't think ammonia is a problem in the soil.

As far as smell and the organic matter, there's a product called Farm360 from Gro2Max that will do the job.

NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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NPIP 43-813

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”                  Mark Twain

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post #3 of 5

The ground that you are talking about is experiencing a nutrient over load. You'll need to increase the carbon content of the ground so that composting can take place and the nutrients made available. The composting will go a LONG WAY towards reducing the smells that you mentioned.

 

You'll need to incorporate high carbon organic materials into the soil and then let the ground go fallow for a season. Cover the ground with large portions of Wood Shavings, Leaf Litter, Straw or Lawn Clippings, then rototill the material into the ground. Another source would be to run a bunch of tree pruning material through a wood chipper...its bulky, but with a high nutrient load it should break down well. It will probably take a lot of material to offset the nutrient load, a  soil test would give you a better idea of how much material you'll need to incorporate. Ask for a recommendation with the soil test...

 

Once everything is rototilled into the ground then water the area and let it sit for the summer. Next spring you should have a nice rich soil...great, awesome garden soil...and NO smell.

"Experince is the teacher of all things." Julius Ceaser

"The only real valuable thing is intuition." Albert Einstein

"Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest" Mark Twain

 

My Coop Project

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/656727/coop-project-maken-the-plunge-getting-chickens

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"Experince is the teacher of all things." Julius Ceaser

"The only real valuable thing is intuition." Albert Einstein

"Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest" Mark Twain

 

My Coop Project

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/656727/coop-project-maken-the-plunge-getting-chickens

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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thank you!

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BackYard Chickens › BYC Forum › Raising BackYard Chickens › Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance › Planting where there used to be a run.