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Looking for general rules of thumb on Chicken Roost Design - Page 2

post #11 of 13

If not too long a roost 2x2's work well. I don't subscribe to wide flat roosts. If needing more strength for length of roost and weight of birds a 2x3 or 2x4 but I hang it upright. Little poop on the roost and plenty width for them to comfortably grab onto. The theory that their feet are covered on flat roost and not a 1.5 inch roost is not true. To prove this yourself make a 2x2 roost and look at an adult bird roosting on it. Can you see it's feet? No.

 

Structurally speaking no wood is secured horizontally with smallest dimension taking the weight. Depth of material is what secures load. If a 2x2 can't take the load than a 2x3 will. You can say I'm thrifty or a cheap SOB, either way I don't purchase material for more money that is not needed. 2x2's are my main material in coop construction, main supports are 2x3's and never use 2x4's. It adds up in costs and weight of coop.


Edited by Egghead_Jr - 5/10/16 at 8:35am

Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.

 

-Charles Dudley Warner

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post #12 of 13

Things to consider-

Roosts should be about a foot higher than the nest boxes, to discourage them from sleeping in the nest boxes.

They should also be wide enough to accommodate the large feet of adult birds, at least 3 inches or more. 

You should have at least 1 linear foot per bird, but more is better.

When determining height, you need to take into consideration how big the coop is. If you put the roosts too high, when they come off in the morning, they tend to launch themselves. If there isn't enough room, they may injure themselves crashing into the walls.

You also need to make sure that your roosts are about a foot apart, or more.

 

On another note, you put in enough next boxes for about 132 hens! You only need 1 per every 4 hens. And even then, most will only lay in one or two boxes...

I would remove the top two rows.

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice, I plan on removing the top row for sure.  We are not sure how many chickens we will end up with before we are done.  We do farm and are starting this as a project for our kids to start selling eggs.  Plan is to buy 6-12 new chicks/year to keep the rotation going.

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