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How well can you bond with a pullet?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hello! As cute as baby chicks are, I'm probably going to have to get a pullet because the agreement with my landlord is NO ROOSTERS and knowing me if I got a chick I'd get too attached to it and I'd feel horrible giving it up if it grew to be a roo. The pullet I'm looking to get will be between 8 to 10 weeks old, and I'm worried it's going to grow up to be scared of me. I want to bond with her and be bffs so if anybody can tell me how well it would work or extra steps I would have to take with her, I'd really appreciate any help <3

post #2 of 5

well you can order a pullet chick they don't all come straight run, and as much as you want to be "BFF's" with her not all chickens are that cuddlyand as for A pullet chickens are social birds and do best in a flock, if you want a friendlier chicken get silkies they are very nice.

post #3 of 5

If possible, get two pullets.  You won't be able to be with your pullet all the time (work/school?), so she'd have a friend rather than being alone.  It really does depend on the breed as to how friendly chickens will be...and somewhat depends on individual personality.  For example, silkies are normally very docile and easy to make pets of.  But only one of my silkies is super friendly...the other two are rather shy/skittish.  Seramas are another breed that tame down very easily (plus they're very small - so easy to handle and can keep in smaller places).

 

Treats, gentle handling, and time are your best assets when trying to make sure a young pullet or cockerel grow up friendly.  If you're picking out your own chicken(s) in person, sit and watch them for a bit, and choose one or two that appear a little calmer...

Caretaker of a lovely mixed flock including: australorp, plymouth rocks, wyandotte, d'uccles, silkies, EEs, andalusian, and a few seramas, plus a golden retriever, great dane, and three cats.  I always swore that I wouldn't succumb to chicken math.  I lied.
 

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Caretaker of a lovely mixed flock including: australorp, plymouth rocks, wyandotte, d'uccles, silkies, EEs, andalusian, and a few seramas, plus a golden retriever, great dane, and three cats.  I always swore that I wouldn't succumb to chicken math.  I lied.
 

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post #4 of 5
You can bond So well with chickens.I have two hens who peep to me when they find food,this is something they "Generally" will do to their chicks.They are never scared of me and would make great pets.

Also,chickens are flock animals,so be sure your always with her,or she has a friend
You need to spend time with,especially while she is young.Hold her, talk to,find food and literally peep and call her over,pet her,read to her,watch tv with her etc.
Edited by TheTwoRoos - 5/14/16 at 6:55pm

I have a  few chickens.

2 barreds,named Falcon and Hawk

1 New Hampshire rooster named,Zeus

2 New Hampshire hens named,Vanillipe (One has no name)

1 silver laced Wyandotte named,Special girl

1 White Leghorn roosters named Foggy

3 black&red Sex links,(Black)angel,and one red is named little red,and the other one is Mrs.Prissy

And a few others that sadly,died

 

I have a 11 ducks.

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I have a  few chickens.

2 barreds,named Falcon and Hawk

1 New Hampshire rooster named,Zeus

2 New Hampshire hens named,Vanillipe (One has no name)

1 silver laced Wyandotte named,Special girl

1 White Leghorn roosters named Foggy

3 black&red Sex links,(Black)angel,and one red is named little red,and the other one is Mrs.Prissy

And a few others that sadly,died

 

I have a 11 ducks.

Reply
post #5 of 5

You really should get more than one. Chickens really need other chickens to be happy. They do not like to be alone. A 10 week old pullet going from a flock situation to a solitary one will likely be very upset at the change. While I know you would like to have a chicken as a pet like a dog, following you around all day, but unfortunately chickens are not dogs. They aren't like some cage birds such as parrots either. Chicken behavior is much different from either of those.

 

Chickens are prey animals, and as far as they are concerned there is safety in numbers. So having more than one is helpful to have content chickens. Being prey, many are not thrilled at being picked up either. Some breeds can be more tolerant than others -such as silkies, Cochins and seramas - but they won't be cuddly like a puppy would be.

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