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Guinea talk. - Page 71

post #701 of 1327
Quote:
Originally Posted by pattyhen View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoria-nola View Post
 

 

We've got a couple of mouser cats that keep things in check here. The cats give the guineas and chickens a wide berth.

I wish I could have  a couple of mouser cats but the dogs hate cats.  They don't mind the ducks, chickens and guineas but they will attack a cat.  They think of cats as predators and will destroy them.  I used to have chickens that loved to go after mice but the ones I have now think of them as their pets.  I've seen them eatting out of the food bowl with a mouse sitting in it.  

 

I haven't seen any evidence of our chickens chasing rodents, for sure.  We don't have any outdoor dogs. We do plan to get started with Nigerian Dwarf goats for dairying, and then we'll need a Livestock Guardian Dog. But our LGD(s)  will have to accept cats, no two ways on that one for us, being cat friendly as we are.  

post #702 of 1327

 

Just getting some fresh air here in Central New York!  They were interested in eating the rose hips off the bushes.  You can see the red berry like fruit if you look really hard.  I think they would have roosted here overnight on the fence if I hadn't gotten after them with the pool noodles and herded them back to the barn.  Silly birds.....

post #703 of 1327

 

Goodnight, sleep tight....

post #704 of 1327

 

Guinea fowl noodling....

post #705 of 1327
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennLee View Post
 

 

Guinea fowl noodling....

 

I haven't heard of this before.  I've been using a large sort of walking stick that I use as a herder, or if they are in a very difficult place all I have to do is get out the long net and they fly themselves out of the place they were only moments before desperately stuck in (heh).  But pool noodles are lightweight and brightly colored.  hrrrrmmmm

 

Love the pic of them on the fence in the snow.  Looks beautiful.

post #706 of 1327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoria-nola View Post
 

 

I haven't heard of this before.  I've been using a large sort of walking stick that I use as a herder, or if they are in a very difficult place all I have to do is get out the long net and they fly themselves out of the place they were only moments before desperately stuck in (heh).  But pool noodles are lightweight and brightly colored.  hrrrrmmmm

 

Love the pic of them on the fence in the snow.  Looks beautiful.


I heard about the stick as well, but then was trying to brainstorm something that would be lighter and I could use two instead of just one.  The pool noodles (from Dollar General) were just the ticket.  I can move my flock of 12 very easily by myself.  Here's a close up of Ella (short for Cinderella) perching near the rose hips.  She was my only gal who went broody this fall (5 months old).  You can get the full effect of what kind of fruit the rose hips provide for the birds.  I make a yummy jelly out of them too.  Thanks for your kind works on the pic.  I can't take credit for the snow, but you are right... it is beautiful! 

 

 

post #707 of 1327
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennLee View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victoria-nola View Post
 

 

I haven't heard of this before.  I've been using a large sort of walking stick that I use as a herder, or if they are in a very difficult place all I have to do is get out the long net and they fly themselves out of the place they were only moments before desperately stuck in (heh).  But pool noodles are lightweight and brightly colored.  hrrrrmmmm

 

Love the pic of them on the fence in the snow.  Looks beautiful.


I heard about the stick as well, but then was trying to brainstorm something that would be lighter and I could use two instead of just one.  The pool noodles (from Dollar General) were just the ticket.  I can move my flock of 12 very easily by myself.  Here's a close up of Ella (short for Cinderella) perching near the rose hips.  She was my only gal who went broody this fall (5 months old).  You can get the full effect of what kind of fruit the rose hips provide for the birds.  I make a yummy jelly out of them too.  Thanks for your kind works on the pic.  I can't take credit for the snow, but you are right... it is beautiful! 

 

 

 

Great pic!  So did Ella bring some keets up?  A lot of times if I don't have my stick I'll use both my arms outstretched and use directional signals to them.  It cracks me up how they actually get it.  So pool noodles would be like extensions of the arms and encompass a much larger area.

post #708 of 1327
Ella abandon the nest when I found her. She was actually gone for 2 nights in the tall grass. When she knew she had been found, she abandon the nest and I collected 38 eggs! They weren't all hers, but obviously it had been a collective nest and she decided to lay on them. It was too late in the season for me to do anything with them. If that happens again this year I am ready though. I have two incubators ready to go!

Yes, the pool noodles are an extension of the arms and it provides quite a length to move the entire flight. It has worked well for me. And they know I mean business when I grab the pool noodles!
post #709 of 1327
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennLee View Post
 

 

Just getting some fresh air here in Central New York!  They were interested in eating the rose hips off the bushes.  You can see the red berry like fruit if you look really hard.  I think they would have roosted here overnight on the fence if I hadn't gotten after them with the pool noodles and herded them back to the barn.  Silly birds.....

This is so pretty them perching on the fence and the snow.  So they like the rose hips?  Aubree has been here all day I haven't had a lot of time for the puter.  Thanks for sharing the pics they are beautiful.

post #710 of 1327
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennLee View Post
 


I heard about the stick as well, but then was trying to brainstorm something that would be lighter and I could use two instead of just one.  The pool noodles (from Dollar General) were just the ticket.  I can move my flock of 12 very easily by myself.  Here's a close up of Ella (short for Cinderella) perching near the rose hips.  She was my only gal who went broody this fall (5 months old).  You can get the full effect of what kind of fruit the rose hips provide for the birds.  I make a yummy jelly out of them too.  Thanks for your kind works on the pic.  I can't take credit for the snow, but you are right... it is beautiful! 

 

 

Love this pic of Ella.  I see her all white feet and that's why you called her Cinderella.  She is so pretty and I hope she hatches you some babies in the spring.  Your view is really spectacular.  My view is the factory across the road.  :D  I never wanted to live in the country until I started getting older.  Now I would love to live in the country.  Take care and have a great day.  Aubree will be going home in about 45 minutes she was sick so she couldn't go to daycare today.  

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