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Need help with Appenzeller Spitzhauben - Page 5

post #41 of 48
That bird she is with looks like she will be a good one to pair her with. The chick has decided you are her mommy and is trying to get back to you. What an adorable little cutie!😍
post #42 of 48

The video was very helpful. It appears the problem with this chick, that has you pulling your hair out with concern, is that she is very high strung. This is an issue with breed temperament and there really isn't anything you can do to stop it or make it better. She has to be able to learn that another docile chicken placed in her cage isn't going to hurt her.

 

I'm guessing you snatch the visiting chicken out of the cage the minute you see the younger chick freaking out. Try leaving them together for a few hours. If you stick around to observe, stay as far away as you can so you aren't interacting. Let the two of them have time to get to know each other. If all goes well, let them sleep together. The more exposure the small chick has to this older one, the greater the chances the two will bond.

 

If you can achieve a bond like that, it will grease the way for her being accepted into the flock.

 

You need to try to relax and let things work themselves out and try not to intervene unless it looks like the chick is getting hurt.

 

Four weeks is too young for her to free range. She won't be old enough to free range, not that she will even want to, for another month at least.

post #43 of 48
Yes! Well put.
post #44 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azygous View Post
 

The video was very helpful. It appears the problem with this chick, that has you pulling your hair out with concern, is that she is very high strung. This is an issue with breed temperament and there really isn't anything you can do to stop it or make it better. She has to be able to learn that another docile chicken placed in her cage isn't going to hurt her.

 

I'm guessing you snatch the visiting chicken out of the cage the minute you see the younger chick freaking out. Try leaving them together for a few hours. If you stick around to observe, stay as far away as you can so you aren't interacting. Let the two of them have time to get to know each other. If all goes well, let them sleep together. The more exposure the small chick has to this older one, the greater the chances the two will bond.

 

If you can achieve a bond like that, it will grease the way for her being accepted into the flock.

 

You need to try to relax and let things work themselves out and try not to intervene unless it looks like the chick is getting hurt.

 

Four weeks is too young for her to free range. She won't be old enough to free range, not that she will even want to, for another month at least.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bantambird View Post

Yes! Well put.


I usually leave them together for 10 minutes but 2 hours it is!

post #45 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bantambird View Post

Yes! Well put.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by azygous View Post
 

The video was very helpful. It appears the problem with this chick, that has you pulling your hair out with concern, is that she is very high strung. This is an issue with breed temperament and there really isn't anything you can do to stop it or make it better. She has to be able to learn that another docile chicken placed in her cage isn't going to hurt her.

 

I'm guessing you snatch the visiting chicken out of the cage the minute you see the younger chick freaking out. Try leaving them together for a few hours. If you stick around to observe, stay as far away as you can so you aren't interacting. Let the two of them have time to get to know each other. If all goes well, let them sleep together. The more exposure the small chick has to this older one, the greater the chances the two will bond.

 

If you can achieve a bond like that, it will grease the way for her being accepted into the flock.

 

You need to try to relax and let things work themselves out and try not to intervene unless it looks like the chick is getting hurt.

 

Four weeks is too young for her to free range. She won't be old enough to free range, not that she will even want to, for another month at least.


So I put them together for about almost 4 hours, and they're total friends! They were doing everything together. Sleeping, eating, scratching.

post #46 of 48

Great! Success! Now, leave them together for good. Do not separate them from here on. They have formed a bond that will serve them both well in days to come when they're coping with the pecking order. But keep them in their cage together apart from the flock, but still in proximity, so they have time to reinforce their bond before starting to mingle with the rest.

 

I'd wait until the younger chick is at least eight weeks old before letting them start to mingle.

post #47 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azygous View Post
 

Great! Success! Now, leave them together for good. Do not separate them from here on. They have formed a bond that will serve them both well in days to come when they're coping with the pecking order. But keep them in their cage together apart from the flock, but still in proximity, so they have time to reinforce their bond before starting to mingle with the rest.

 

I'd wait until the younger chick is at least eight weeks old before letting them start to mingle.


I have a difficult question. I don't think Ill be able to keep her for 4 more weeks. I'm moving soon to California and I have to get an Appraisal to check how much my house is. What should I do? (I have to clean the whole house and declutter and im pretty sure animals in the house would mean im not "taking care" of the house)

post #48 of 48
Can the whole kennel move into the run with the other birds? Now that she has a best buddy, you should be able to transition both of them in the kennel outside into or next to your other chicken area, where the rest can see and hear your chick but not get to her and her friend. Keep those 2 together, and it should be OK now to move them outside.
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