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I'm so confused! Heat lamp in the coop or not? In the winter or not? - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

@ChickenMammX4 and everyone else who's taken the time to respond, I appreciate it! 

 

I just want to clarify when you guys say draft free...

Our coop used to be a kids playhouse that's been converted.  It's 4' wide by 6' long and about 6' tall at the peek of the roof, with a screen in the top portion of the peek shape, approx. the top 2 feet (which we are going to cover with hardware cloth). The back wall is solid all the way to the roof, making this front section the only "window" when the coop doors are shut.  I assume this must remain open in the winter, but does that create a draft in the coop?

 

In addition, on the side is a large dog house that they can enter from the main coop that gives them an additional space of maybe 3' wide x 4' long x 3' tall, although I haven't decided how to use this space (I'm thinking I'll hinge the roof and put the feed and water in this room).  This dog house has a slanted roof with maybe a one inch gap just under the roof top all the way around (which will also need to be covered with hardware cloth).  Again, will this cause drafts in the winter or give proper ventilation?   If the dog house portion were too drafty, would they just move to the main portion of the coop?

 

@RonP  These girls are also our pets and will live out a happy retirement in the coop (no soup pot for them!), so it's nice to hear it's possible they keep laying... everyone keeps telling me 2-3 years...

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Des R View Post
 

@ChickenMammX4 and everyone else who's taken the time to respond, I appreciate it! 

 

I just want to clarify when you guys say draft free...

Our coop used to be a kids playhouse that's been converted.  It's 4' wide by 6' long and about 6' tall at the peek of the roof, with a screen in the top portion of the peek shape, approx. the top 2 feet (which we are going to cover with hardware cloth). The back wall is solid all the way to the roof, making this front section the only "window" when the coop doors are shut.  I assume this must remain open in the winter, but does that create a draft in the coop?

 

In addition, on the side is a large dog house that they can enter from the main coop that gives them an additional space of maybe 3' wide x 4' long x 3' tall, although I haven't decided how to use this space (I'm thinking I'll hinge the roof and put the feed and water in this room).  This dog house has a slanted roof with maybe a one inch gap just under the roof top all the way around (which will also need to be covered with hardware cloth).  Again, will this cause drafts in the winter or give proper ventilation?   If the dog house portion were too drafty, would they just move to the main portion of the coop?

 

@RonP  These girls are also our pets and will live out a happy retirement in the coop (no soup pot for them!), so it's nice to hear it's possible they keep laying... everyone keeps telling me 2-3 years...

 

I was trying to figure this out recently too.

 

I have decided that if the hardware cloth is up high then it will allow the ammonia to escape.

However if it's down low then the chickens will get caught in the wind and it will chill them.

 

So, will the wind that gets through into your coop hit your chickens? If so I think you need to cover it up.

Is your hole high enough that the wind won't hit them? If so leave it. It will help keep their coop smelling good.

 

This is just my opinion on the matter.

 

If I am wrong please correct me as I would like to do what's best for my chickens too.

 

MW

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hmmm, that makes me wonder... I was planning on putting some roosting poles up toward that area.  Can I put them up high and lower down and trust the chickens would move down if a breeze came through or just not give them the option... ?

post #14 of 17

This is going to be your call.

 

Use your best judgement to keep the birds out of drafts that will ruffle their feathers, all while allowing as much ventilation as possible. As others stated, up high above any roost is best.

 

Remember, birds will try to find the highest roost.

Once dark, they won't move much, even if the wind starts blowing. :/

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply

Heat the nesting boxes to stop eggs from freezing.

Forever Water Heater one that lasts.

Unfrozen Nipple Watering for those cold days.

Removing dust the easy way.

Quick and Easy 5 Gallon Waterer.

Reply
post #15 of 17

Skip the heat lamp in winter. Keep the coop draft free with ventilation.   I have two windows on the south side of the coop.  The window furthest from the roosts stays open all winter with the exception of when a snow storm is coming in from the south or southwest so snow doesn't get in the coop.

 

I've been raising chickens for well over 40 years.   I cannot remember ever losing a bird in the cold, heat absolutely.

 

Beside heat lamps are dangerous.  A family lost their home to a heat lamp in a coop last winter here, caught the coop on fire while no one was home and embers caught the house roof on fire and it burned to the ground.  Another instance in which someone's home burned due to  heat lamp in a "cat house".

 

Trust us your chickens will do just fine.
 


Edited by scooter147 - 5/18/16 at 8:03am
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Des R View Post
 

Hmmm, that makes me wonder... I was planning on putting some roosting poles up toward that area.  Can I put them up high and lower down and trust the chickens would move down if a breeze came through or just not give them the option... ?

Chickens do not need high roosts.  My roosts are only 22 inches above the floor and they are perfectly happy.  The coop is 5 feet tall with 8 inches high by 3 foot long vents just under the eaves.  The girls don't get a breeze on them when they are roosting.  I wouldn't count on them moving down to a lower roost when the wind is blowing.  Chickens equate highest roost with highest of the pecking order.  You could have higher roosts when the weather is pleasant and remove those high roosts for the winter. 

post #17 of 17

I think you are well on track! My girls are 3 weeks old and with the advice on this site they have really grown and I love being a chicken keeper.  I live in the exact opposite temp (Arizona desert).   There are many experienced people on this blog and I am grateful for all of the assistance!!

"Optimism is a relatively stable trait and shows an inverse association with the risk of cardiovascular death" Arch Intern Med. Feb. 2006;166:431-436.
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"Optimism is a relatively stable trait and shows an inverse association with the risk of cardiovascular death" Arch Intern Med. Feb. 2006;166:431-436.
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