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Biosecurity question- adding to the flock

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
4.5 weeks ago we got 4 chicks from a breeder. I'm thinking of adding another chick (close in age/size to the ones I already have) to the flock from the same breeder. Does this present a biosecurity risk? I'm ultra paranoid as a first time chick mom, if you couldn't tell!!
post #2 of 8

Personally, I wouldn't worry about it if they came from the same breeder. 

Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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Chickens off and on for 25+ years and still learning.

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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbi-j View Post

Personally, I wouldn't worry about it if they came from the same breeder. 
Thank you! I know that it's a silly question. I just love these little chicks so much.
post #4 of 8

However, I would not try to add a single chick to an established group, even if they are the same size and there is plenty of space. A single bird is a very difficult to do. ALL of the original birds knows this is a strange bird, and they will all terrorize her. Either get more that a single chick (which spreads the pecking around) or separate one of your chicks now, and put with the new chick, separating them a few days with wire, then putting them together, when they get along, and they won't at first, then adding the pair back to the group. The group will still hand out some hard pecks, but with more to peck on it spreads it out so it is not quite so concentrated.

 

This is going to be pretty stressful for the whole deal I think.

 

Mrs k


Edited by Mrs. K - 5/18/16 at 7:49pm
Western South Dakota Rancher
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Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. K View Post

However, I would not try to add a single chick to an established group, even if they are the same size and there is plenty of space. A single bird is a very difficult to do. ALL of the original birds knows this is a strange bird, and they will all terrorize her. Either get more that a single chick (which spreads the pecking around) or separate one of your chicks now, and put with the new chick, separating them a few days with wire, then putting them together, when they get along, and they won't at first, then adding the pair back to the group. The group will still hand out some hard pecks, but with more to peck on it spreads it out so it is not quite so concentrated.

This is going to be pretty stressful for the whole deal I think.

Mrs k

Oh darn. They're only like 5 weeks old, so I was hoping the pecking thing wouldn't happen yet.
post #6 of 8

 Chickens are often rather mean to each other. It might work, but I think it will be rather rough, and it can be deadly.

Western South Dakota Rancher
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post #7 of 8

Agrees bio quarantine is likely unnecessary.

 

Territoriality, over space/food/water, issues can start pretty young, it's instinctual.

If the 4 don't accept the new one, try putting it in a cage next to the others for a few days....then maybe put 1 of the 4 in with it...then may be another.

Watch their behaviors, mix and match, lots of space, multiple water/feed stations, places to hide can all help.

 

What kind of brooder/coop/run do you have?

Sizes(feet by feet) and pics can help us help you find a solution.


Edited by aart - 5/19/16 at 4:13am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 

Agrees bio quarantine is likely unnecessary.

 

Territoriality, over space/food/water, issues can start pretty young, it's instinctual.

If the 4 don't accept the new one, try putting it in a cage next to the others for a few days....then maybe put 1 of the 4 in with it...then may be another.

Watch their behaviors, mix and match, lots of space, multiple water/feed stations, places to hide can all help.

 

What kind of brooder/coop/run do you have?

Sizes(feet by feet) and pics can help us help you find a solution.


we have a starter coop from urban coop company meant for 5 bantams. we are having a 3'x40' run made on the side of the house. we have a small yard and this is our only option to have the coop and run not be connected. we have 4 silkies and cochins approx 6 weeks old. their brooder is a very large cardboard box and they're feathered enough to spend the day in the coop and sleep in the brooder at night.

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