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Asil Chickens! - Page 2  

post #11 of 40

Hey Chicken Gurl,
  Thanks for the link to the Asil article. Now I really wont rest until I am working with those birds.
                               Icarus

post #12 of 40

I have a couple of Asil roosters free ranging on my property.  They're beautiful and hardy, but they will indeed kick the crap out of other roosters.  They aren't huge birds but ounce for ounce I can't think of a more determined fighter.  Make sure if you have them you isolate them from other roosters or you give the other roosters plenty of room to get out of the way of the Asils.

.

.

post #13 of 40

Actually, if you want some really true info on this breed, go to this link and talk to James. He is hands down one of the most knowledgeable folks you will ever meet!

http://poultryone.com/forum/

  bigzio

Calling all Wisconsinites....come and enjoy the days of Spring with us on the "Cheesehead" thread!  http:/ http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=44015700

Annual Bash...A must Event http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/851229/fifth-annual-wicheeseheads-bash#post_12728453

Calling all Wisconsinites....come and enjoy the days of Spring with us on the "Cheesehead" thread!  http:/ http://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=44015700

Annual Bash...A must Event http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/851229/fifth-annual-wicheeseheads-bash#post_12728453

post #14 of 40

Mikarod....
where do you get your info?
Your idea that a fighting cock is trained TO FIGHT is way way way off.
Chickens are essentially pretty stupid.  THey can be trained to come when you call (for feed.)  They can be trained not to run away from you, and to handle easily (with food.)   And they can be trained to stay out of the way of a spur (by another rooster.)
But they cannot be trained to fight.  Either they will, or they won't.  That is why really good game fowl are EXPENSIVE.  because it is genetic and cannot be taught.  All chickens will fight to a point.  what separates gamfowl?  two things.  one, they can take a lot more pain.  two, they are better at killing than others.
that is all.

Mixed Longcrowers and Longtails.  GreY junglefowl Hybrids.
Just the coolest chickens ever.  That's all.
Pictures of some Bengals, scroll to the bottom after you click on the link;
http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/NDG/BRKGJF.html
Mixed Longcrowers and Longtails.  GreY junglefowl Hybrids.
Just the coolest chickens ever.  That's all.
Pictures of some Bengals, scroll to the bottom after you click on the link;
http://www.feathersite.com/Poultry/NDG/BRKGJF.html
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by wclawrence 

Mikarod....
where do you get your info?
Your idea that a fighting cock is trained TO FIGHT is way way way off.
Chickens are essentially pretty stupid.  THey can be trained to come when you call (for feed.)  They can be trained not to run away from you, and to handle easily (with food.)   And they can be trained to stay out of the way of a spur (by another rooster.)
But they cannot be trained to fight.  Either they will, or they won't.  That is why really good game fowl are EXPENSIVE.  because it is genetic and cannot be taught.  All chickens will fight to a point.  what separates gamfowl?  two things.  one, they can take a lot more pain.  two, they are better at killing than others.
that is all.


Well said, the student is only a student if they are willing to learn.... great post wclawrence..

post #16 of 40

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w91/prariechiken/ZookAsils.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w91/prariechiken/AsilStag.jpg

Got aseels????? big_smile

post #17 of 40

Maybe your chickens are stupid, mine are able to play tic-tac-toe.

Fighting birds, while having the genetics to be overly aggressive are also trained.  They are trained to not attack their owners and also to not run away from a fight. 

Honestly...do you guys just constantly flame everyone who is opinionated...or am I just lucky?

post #18 of 40

mikarod,
You seem to have a strong opinion about cockfighting, is this backed up by some type of experience? I mean, do you have a lot of first hand knowlege on the "game/fighting" breeds? Do you breed or raise Asil, Shamo, or even Old English Game? This is not ment to be inflamitory, I am just trying to understand your point of view.

BR Ameraucanas, BBS Jersey Giants, BLR and SL Wyandottes
BR Ameraucanas, BBS Jersey Giants, BLR and SL Wyandottes
post #19 of 40

While I have not actually bred those breeds, I have lived next to a fighting operation for some years.  Once the cock-fighting ban was enacted, my neighbors moved.  I had gone over there several times just to look at the birds and had discussed several things with them.

They said:
1.  The birds are naturally aggressive.
2.  The birds were trained to not attack their owners.
3.  The birds were trained to not run from other cocks (however, I'm not certain this is the case being that a bantam D'Uccle will take on a Standard Langshan cockerel...)


Whether these statements were true, or only true for this farm in particular, I cannot say.  I will say that these birds never attacked their owners and were not aggressive towards their hens or children that were in the pens with them.

My ORIGINAL post was to let the original poster know that the Asil or any other breed, will not automatically be a fighting chicken.  It may fight, like all birds will, but will not be the deadly killers they were once portrayed as.  Some breeds are more aggressive than others.  For instance...why the RIR was not considered a fighting bird I have YET to figure out.  Those males can be mean suckers.  But then, there are also very sweet cocks in that breed too.


Edited by mikarod - 12/8/08 at 8:51am
post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikarod 

While I have not actually bred those breeds, I have lived next to a fighting operation for some years.  Once the cock-fighting ban was enacted, my neighbors moved.  I had gone over there several times just to look at the birds and had discussed several things with them.

They said:
1.  The birds are naturally aggressive.
2.  The birds were trained to not attack their owners.
3.  The birds were trained to not run from other cocks (however, I'm not certain this is the case being that a bantam D'Uccle will take on a Standard Langshan cockerel...)


Whether these statements were true, or only true for this farm in particular, I cannot say.  I will say that these birds never attacked their owners and were not aggressive towards their hens or children that were in the pens with them.


i've been around the gamefowl all my life. known numerous breeders... never fought but have raised them. the breeders i talked to always bred them so they wouldn't do neither 2 or 3, never trained. agressiveness is only towards other cocks, which even non-gamefowl breeds are to some extent agressive towards other roosters.

Fourth generation poultry breeder focusing on Kraienköppe- the breed that won my heart and replaced all others on my farm.
http://www.freewebs.com/dtsfowl/

 

Interested in poultry showing? Live in Mississippi or a nearby state? Check out the Mississippi Poultry Show Club

Fourth generation poultry breeder focusing on Kraienköppe- the breed that won my heart and replaced all others on my farm.
http://www.freewebs.com/dtsfowl/

 

Interested in poultry showing? Live in Mississippi or a nearby state? Check out the Mississippi Poultry Show Club

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