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wild baby bunny help - Page 2

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckGirl77 View Post
 

I don't think you should put it down. If it recovers, there are things you can do to help it live a normal life.

Here's what information I could find. I don't know what the likekihood of its survival is, but it's worth a try to save it. The link at the bottom is where I got the info.

 

"An animal in shock may show pale gums, cool extremities (including ears), glassy or closed eyes, weak pulse, increased rate of breathing and increased heart rate. If you feel that your rabbit may be in shock, wrap it in a towel, provide supplemental heat (if possible) and place the rabbit in a carrier for immediate transport to a vet clinic .... Injuries can occur that result in tearing of the skin. Bleeding will not usually be serious, unless the injuries are deeper than the skin. Lacerations to the skin can occur if two rabbits get into a fight, or if a rabbit is bitten by another animal. Bites are always considered very serious in rabbits and should be dealt with immediately upon discovery. If you see bleeding from a wound and it appears to be pulsing or gushing, this means that an artery may have been damaged. If the blood is seeping, this usually implies bleeding from veins. Using a sterile gauze pad (or if that is not readily available), a clean towel or cloth, apply firm, but gentle, pressure directly over the wound. If a pad becomes saturated with blood, do not remove it, but apply another one over it and continue applying pressure until you get to the veterinary clinic. Make sure you assess the gum color by lifting up the lip and looking at the tissue above the teeth. You can evaluate the capillary refill time by gently pushing on the gum tissue and watching to see how quickly the color returns to the tissue (in a normal rabbit, this should take less than 1.5 seconds).

If possible, bite wounds should be flushed with copious amounts of warm, soapy water (unless the wounds are deeper than the skin, in which case you should wait until you can seek professional care). Povidone iodine solution, diluted to iced tea color in warm water, is wonderful for flushing superficial wounds. In a pinch, antiseptic soap and warm water can be used to clean wounds. If you think that your rabbit may be in shock, do not waste precious time cleaning wounds at home. Flushing wounds may also exacerbate shock by further chilling the rabbit."

http://www.exoticpetvet.net/smanimal/rabfirstaid.html

 

 

Thanks! It seems to be a bit better and no longer bleeding. My mom picked up some baby animal formula and it drank a bit. She also has in in a dark box with towels and a heat source. 

Still waiting for the wildlife rehab to call back. Fingers crossed. 

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jujubara View Post
 

 

 

Thanks! It seems to be a bit better and no longer bleeding. My mom picked up some baby animal formula and it drank a bit. She also has in in a dark box with towels and a heat source. 

Still waiting for the wildlife rehab to call back. Fingers crossed. 

So glad to hear that! I hope it will make it!

Burd-Lover through and through

 

I am a Christian. Jesus is awesome!

1 John 5:12 - He who has the Son has life.

Reply

Burd-Lover through and through

 

I am a Christian. Jesus is awesome!

1 John 5:12 - He who has the Son has life.

Reply
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckGirl77 View Post
 

So glad to hear that! I hope it will make it!

Me too! I'll update. Thanks for the info!

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Update: bunny died a short time ago. We thought it would pull through when it started eating, but one of the injuries must have been internal. Thanks for any help you guys provided.
post #15 of 19

I'm sorry to hear this, even though it is the outcome I expected. Baby rabbits are pretty fragile; if shock and blood loss doesn't do them in, infection probably will. You gave him a chance, and that was all you reasonably could do.

post #16 of 19

Oh no! :hitThat's so sad! You tried, though, and that's what counts.

Burd-Lover through and through

 

I am a Christian. Jesus is awesome!

1 John 5:12 - He who has the Son has life.

Reply

Burd-Lover through and through

 

I am a Christian. Jesus is awesome!

1 John 5:12 - He who has the Son has life.

Reply
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yeah. Pretty sad.
post #18 of 19
We lost one like this a couple of weeks ago - a neighbor had taken it away from his cat. It, too, seemed to be pulling itself together, then rapidly went down. Prey animals are awfully good at disguising injury and illness; they need to be.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnylady View Post

We lost one like this a couple of weeks ago - a neighbor had taken it away from his cat. It, too, seemed to be pulling itself together, then rapidly went down. Prey animals are awfully good at disguising injury and illness; they need to be.

Yes they do hide it well! We think the other litter mates are also gone. Too bad that dog is such a meanie. A few years ago she killed a bunch of baby squirrels. They never stood a chance. One reason she doesn't go anywhere near my chickens, of course my dogs would kill her if she did.
Edited by Jujubara - 5/22/16 at 5:24pm
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