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My Garden

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
My garden consists of different types of tomato plants different types of pepper plants kale lettuce onions marigolds cuz you can eat Marigold flowers, pumpkins gourds lemon balm and an apple tree do I need any other plants I'm pretty sure I do like I am going to need another apple tree reply if you think I should have any other plants
:* American Farmer :*
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:* American Farmer :*
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post #2 of 4

if you have space for it.. i don't see why not

 

but  check the companion plants list

 

http://www.almanac.com/content/companion-planting-garden

http://www.almanac.com/content/plant-companions-list-ten-common-vegetables

What i posted above are just my opinions.. they are NOT facts.
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What i posted above are just my opinions.. they are NOT facts.
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post #3 of 4
I have no idea of what your goals are, what you like to eat, whether you preserve food by canning or freezing, how much room you have or time to dedicate to gardening, or what herbs you like to cook with. You might talk to your county extension agent and see if they have something that tells you what you can grow in your area. In Arkansas I got a calendar that tells me when to plant things here but that also gives me a list of things that people plant here. It is very helpful. It gave me ideas on what I could grow here.

Most apple trees require a different variety to act as a pollinator. If your neighbors have a tree within reasonable distance you are OK, crab apples are great pollinators too, but you may need a different variety that flowers at the same time as yours. What variety is your apple tree?

I like to grow and dry herbs like basil, oregano, sage, chives, parsley, dill, and coriander. Some are annuals, some perennials. Garlic is another one that is easy to grow and is great for flavoring food. I grow a lot of beans too, both for green beans and dried beans. I’d hate to go through a summer without fresh corn from the garden. I also grow a lot of fruits and berries to make jellies or jams which I give away as Christmas presents. But we each have our own goals and personal preferences. What works for me may not work for you.

I suggest you try what you have. It sounds like you are just starting out this year. Don’t over-do it this year, see how it goes and what works for you. Once you determine time and space requirements and see what grows well for you, start experimenting. But don’t start so big you burn out. Your garden and orchard will evolve over time. One exception to this is if you decide you want different fruit or nut trees, get them in the ground this fall. They take time before they start to produce. You don’t want to wait too long to get them started. But this fall/winter is probably the best time to start them.

Good luck!

When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

 

"If you make every game a life-and-death proposition, you're going to have problems. For one thing, you'll be dead a lot." — former North Carolina coach Dean Smith

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/a/how-much-room-do-chickens-need

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post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post

I have no idea of what your goals are, what you like to eat, whether you preserve food by canning or freezing, how much room you have or time to dedicate to gardening, or what herbs you like to cook with. You might talk to your county extension agent and see if they have something that tells you what you can grow in your area. In Arkansas I got a calendar that tells me when to plant things here but that also gives me a list of things that people plant here. It is very helpful. It gave me ideas on what I could grow here.

Most apple trees require a different variety to act as a pollinator. If your neighbors have a tree within reasonable distance you are OK, crab apples are great pollinators too, but you may need a different variety that flowers at the same time as yours. What variety is your apple tree?

I like to grow and dry herbs like basil, oregano, sage, chives, parsley, dill, and coriander. Some are annuals, some perennials. Garlic is another one that is easy to grow and is great for flavoring food. I grow a lot of beans too, both for green beans and dried beans. I’d hate to go through a summer without fresh corn from the garden. I also grow a lot of fruits and berries to make jellies or jams which I give away as Christmas presents. But we each have our own goals and personal preferences. What works for me may not work for you.

I suggest you try what you have. It sounds like you are just starting out this year. Don’t over-do it this year, see how it goes and what works for you. Once you determine time and space requirements and see what grows well for you, start experimenting. But don’t start so big you burn out. Your garden and orchard will evolve over time. One exception to this is if you decide you want different fruit or nut trees, get them in the ground this fall. They take time before they start to produce. You don’t want to wait too long to get them started. But this fall/winter is probably the best time to start them.

Good luck!

Actually it's my second year, and most of my plants had died. But I like how you think.
:* American Farmer :*
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:* American Farmer :*
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