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2 week old chick attacks my hand and launches at brooder door when it sees me - Page 2

post #11 of 19

Dominance training is what I do with a young roo... one who thinks he's going to be aggressive with humans.  (start it just as soon as the aggressive behavior starts.)  It would work equally well with a little gal, or a hen of any age who doesn't mind her p's and q's.  You pick up the bird who wants to peck and attack you, place it in a foot ball hold, and push the head down below their chest.  Every time the bird picks up his head, you push it down, and continue doing so until he voluntarily keeps it down.  If he bites, you can grab the feathers on the back of his head to keep him from turning to bite you while pushing his head down.  You then set him down so his feet are on the ground while still restraining his body.  He'll most likely pick his head back up, and struggle to get away.  continue pushing his head down till he submits while you gently restrain him, and he keeps head down.  Then you let him go.  Continue this daily, or as long as his behavior is aggressive.  The other part of dominance training involves teaching him that YOU own the space around the flock.  Where ever he happens to be standing, that's where you need to be.  You shoo him out of your path.  If you give treats to the flock, you may take a thin stick, and gently tap his tail feathers to shoo him away from the treats while the rest of the flock eats.  Never walk around him.  Walk through him.  Make him move out of your way.  Some roos need it, some are fast learners and take their lessons from the rest of the flock, never offering any type of aggressive behavior.  I thought Little Man was destined for the stew pot.  But a week of training turned him into a perfect gentleman.  He would have been raised up to be a replacement for Jack, if timing was such that Jack needed to go.  But... Jack (my Avatar pic of him doesn't do him justice) is holding his own, and a proud Daddy of yet an other generation of youngsters.


Edited by lazy gardener - 5/23/16 at 7:33am

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazy gardener View Post
 

Dominance training is what I do with a young roo... one who thinks he's going to be aggressive with humans.  (start it just as soon as the aggressive behavior starts.)  It would work equally well with a little gal, or a hen of any age who doesn't mind her p's and q's.  You pick up the bird who wants to peck and attack you, place it in a foot ball hold, and push the head down below their chest.  Every time the bird picks up his head, you push it down, and continue doing so until he voluntarily keeps it down.  If he bites, you can grab the feathers on the back of his head to keep him from turning to bite you while pushing his head down.  You then set him down so his feet are on the ground while still restraining his body.  He'll most likely pick his head back up, and struggle to get away.  continue pushing his head down till he submits while you gently restrain him, and he keeps head down.  Then you let him go.  Continue this daily, or as long as his behavior is aggressive.  The other part of dominance training involves teaching him that YOU own the space around the flock.  Where ever he happens to be standing, that's where you need to be.  You shoo him out of your path.  If you give treats to the flock, you may take a thin stick, and gently tap his tail feathers to shoo him away from the treats while the rest of the flock eats.  Never walk around him.  Walk through him.  Make him move out of your way.  Some roos need it, some are fast learners and take their lessons from the rest of the flock, never offering any type of aggressive behavior.  I thought Little Man was destined for the stew pot.  But a week of training turned him into a perfect gentleman.  He would have been raised up to be a replacement for Jack, if timing was such that Jack needed to go.  But... Jack (my Avatar pic of him doesn't do him justice) is holding his own, and a proud Daddy of yet an other generation of youngsters.

Thank you for your thoughtful response. Another great tool for my new toolbox! And here I thought chicken keeping would be easy...lol

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwistedTails View Post
 

Thank you for your thoughtful response. Another great tool for my new toolbox! And here I thought chicken keeping would be easy...lol

It is.  You just have to be observant and learn how to think like a chicken.  Also helps to have mentors along the way.:old

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ok, so the same chick I was complaining about being a bit aggressive towards me is also starting to charge at all the other chicks in the brooder and is basically up to all sorts of shenanigans. I finally got a somewhat decent picture of her/him and am curious what you all think...girl or boy? It is 3 weeks old...also, if it is a roo, is there anyone in northern Minnesota interested in adopting him for free?

 

 

 

post #15 of 19
Yes looks like a cockerel
post #16 of 19

Agreed.  In the mean time, you might want to start some dominance training.  That lil boy has a full charge of hormones!  

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply

Jesus Christ is my pilot.

My husband of 41 years is my best friend and co-pilot.

Enjoying my gardens.  My flock are my garden helpers.

Breeding a winter hearty flock with small combs and colored eggs.

Favorite breeds:  Dominique and EE.  Hatching addict.

 

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1084432/egg-gender-selection-survey

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1013154/byc-member-interview-laz...

Reply
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

Bummer. That is what I thought. I will work on the dominance training, but not sure how long I can keep him in the brooder with the rest with the way he is acting. Sigh. I think I may have bitten off more than I can chew.

post #18 of 19

But he'll be tasty!  Sorry, but he sounds like a bad boy all around, so good luck with him.  Mary

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly's place View Post
 

But he'll be tasty!  Sorry, but he sounds like a bad boy all around, so good luck with him.  Mary

Yeah, that's what my husband said. The only time he is nice is when I am holding him. He almost acts like that just so I pick him up and hold him.

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